Cold-Hardy Winter Veggies to Grow

Don't limit your vegetable garden to the summer and fall. Grow cold-hardy winter vegetables that have proven they can take the cold.

DSCN0172.JPG

Cabbage

Cabbage is a very cold-hardy vegetable.

Cabbage is a very cold-hardy vegetable.

This year, keep your gardening growing even after temperatures drop. There are many vegetables that will grow well in a winter vegetable garden. In many areas these plants can grow with minimal protection, but for the best chances of success, make arrangements to cover them in the most adverse weather.

These rugged veggies will reward you with a healthful harvest to help ward off cold and flu and the winter blues:

1: Arugula is at its best in cold weather.  If you have tried growing this popular salad green in warm weather and have been disappointed in the too-strong flavor, try again in winter.

2: Broccoli will continue to produce side shoot florets once the main head is harvested. Well-established plants can produce these shoots throughout much of the winter.

3: Brussels sprouts are the most cold-hardy of the cabbage family. They take a long time to mature, so plant early.

4: Cabbage is very hardy, but heads will develop very slowly in the cold. Get an early fall start and stagger the plantings every two weeks to enjoy fresh cabbage most of the winter.

5: Endive and radicchio are members of the chicory family and make wonderful additions to winter salads. They can also be cooked.

6: Garlic planted in fall will grow “scallions”—known as scapes—that can be harvested lightly. Use them in the same recipes you would use garlic cloves or onion scallions.

7: Kale, collards and mustard make delicious additions to winter soups and stews. As with the other greens, they also taste great in salads when the leaves are young and tender. They are contenders with spinach as the healthiest of all “greens.”

8: Spinach is Popeye’s favorite for good reason. There are approximately 12 million ways to enjoy spinach raw, cooked or somewhere in-between.

9: Swiss chard is in the same family as beets, but the greens have a milder flavor. It is often cooked,  but young leaves are good in salads as well.

10: Turnips and rutabagas round out the flavor of winter soups and stews. They also taste great roasted in a root vegetable blend with carrots, parsnips, potatoes, onions and beets.

Bonus recommendation: Parsley is an herb to consider for the winter garden. The foliage of curled leaf parsley is hardier than flat leaf. In the kitchen, parsley mixes well with other veggies as well as meat and fish. It can be a garnish or partner of the main ingredient—think spinach parsley pesto.

Next Up

Growing and Caring for Hellebores

The gorgeous Lenten rose, or hellebore, is a winter bloomer that delights in even the coldest temperatures.

What to Plant in Winter

Keep busy planting in winter tackling these chores, no matter where you garden.

How to Build a Hoop House to Protect Your Vegetables

Extend your cool-weather growing season and even get a jump on spring with a DIY hoop house frame to cover a raised bed.

How to Grow Peas

Peas are a can't-fail, early spring pleasure. Learn how to add these edible beauties to your vegetable garden.

How Long Does Asparagus Take to Grow?

This vegetable can rival a sloth for slowness. Learn two ways to hurry things up.

How and When to Bring Houseplants Inside for Winter

Houseplants that have spent summer basking in the great outdoors need a little TLC before moving them inside for the winter. Get tips on how to successfully transition your plants from summer to winter.

How to Grow Tomatoes in a Raised Bed

If your soil doesn't drain well, you might be better off growing your tomatoes in raised beds.

What's the Difference Between a Yam and a Sweet Potato?

These two veggies are often called the same thing or misidentified; find out how to tell the difference between these two tasty tubers.

How to Grow Rhubarb

Learn how to plant rhubarb and when to harvest rhubarb stalks that can add a distinctive tartness to such treats as pies and jams.

How to Grow Microgreens

Packed with nutrition, microgreens add robust vegetable or herb flavor to dishes, but they can be costly to buy at the grocery store. Luckily, they’re very easy to grow from seed at home and can be grown year-round indoors, regardless of climate.

Go Shopping

Get product recommendations from HGTV editors, plus can’t-miss sales and deals.

On TV

Follow Us Everywhere

Join the party! Don't miss HGTV in your favorite social media feeds.