15 Vegetables You Can Plant Now for Fall Harvest

Just as the summer garden gets in full swing, it's time to start thinking about fall. Here's a list of 15 vegetables you can plant in mid to late summer for a fall harvest.

July 24, 2020

Photo By: Ball Horticultural Company

Photo By: National Garden Bureau

©Image courtesy of Ben Rollins

Photo By: Image courtesy of Felder Rushing

Photo By: Ball Horticultural Company

Photo By: Image courtesy of Blackberry Farm ©2013, HGTV/Scripps Networks, LLC. All Rights Reserved.

Photo By: Johnny’s Selected Seeds

Photo By: Image courtesy of Blackberry Farm ©2013, HGTV/Scripps Networks, LLC. All Rights Reserved.

Photo By: Johnny’s Selected Seeds

Photo By: Photo courtesy of the National Garden Bureau

Photo By: Johnny’s Selected Seeds

Beans

Beans of all types grow quickly and can produce abundant harvests up until frost. This makes them ideal for succession planting, meaning planting at intervals throughout the growing season. You can even start beans in the heat of summer. Sow outdoors directly in the soil. If you're growing pole beans, add a trellis; if you're growing bush varieties, no trellis is needed.

Learn More: How to Freeze Green Beans

Beets

Beets are an ideal fall crop. Sow seeds directly outdoors; you can pre-soak seeds to help with germination. In warmer climates especially, sow seeds in late summer under taller crops like tomatoes or peppers to provide a little shade. After the temperatures cool and you remove the tall crops, beets will thrive.

Learn More: Beet Varieties to Grow in Your Garden

Radishes

Radishes are one of the quickest maturing crops at four weeks from seed to harvest. Like beets, you can sow under taller summer crops to provide a little shade. You can stagger plantings to get a couple harvests of radishes from late summer through fall.

Learn More: Staggered Planting: What It Is and Why You Should Be Doing It

Broccoli

Broccoli can be sown directly into the garden in late summer for a fall harvest, or plant from transplants for a little ease. Broccoli is sensitive to frost and freeze, so cover to protect the growing buds in the event of an early cold spell.

Learn More: Garden to Table: Broccoli

Brussels Sprouts

Brussels sprouts love cool weather and are often grown in cool climates as a spring crop that holds in the garden through summer. In warmer climates, though, Brussels sprouts can be started in fall and grown through winter into early spring. They can take a little frost. Start from seed indoors and transplant outside when weather cools, or buy transplants at your local garden center.

Learn More: Garden to Table: Brussels Sprouts

Turnips

If you've never had roasted turnips, you're missing out. Turnips are easy to grow in the fall garden and into winter. Direct sow in late summer to early fall. Roots are ready to harvest when they start popping up from the soil line. Smaller turnips roots are more tender.

Learn More: Garden to Table: Turnips

Collards

Collard greens are popular in Southern gardens, but they’re easy to grow almost anywhere, as long as they’re planted in the cool weather of spring or fall. They taste sweeter when they're lightly touched by frost.

Learn More: Growing Collards

Green Onions

Green onions can be direct sown in late summer and harvested through fall and early winter.

Learn More: Freezing Green Onions

Kohlrabi

Kohlrabi is a fast grower for the cool season, taking only six weeks to mature.

Learn More: Winter Vegetable Garden

Lettuce

Lettuce loves cool weather. Plant in late summer to early fall to enjoy in an autumn salad. You can also tuck lettuces into fall container gardens alongside pansies and other fall blooms. You can plant from transplants but lettuce also grows easily from seed.

Learn More: Cool-Weather Greens

Cauliflower

Cauliflower can be grown in spring and fall but is tempermental about heat and cold — it likes mild temps in between. For a fall harvest, plant transplants outdoors after temperatures are consistently in the 70s and below. Cover in the event of an early freeze.

Learn More: Garden to Table: Cauliflower

Peas

Peas grow well in cool weather. Choose a short season variety for an autumn harvest and sow outdoors once temperatures have started to drop into the 70s and below.

Kale

Kale thrives in cool weather and keeps in the garden even through winter. Direct sow in early fall and enjoy harvests through the holidays and beyond.

Learn More: Garden to Table: Kale

Parsnips

Direct sow parsnips in the summer and plan on harvesting after frost when the flavor improves. Parsnips keep well in the garden through winter.

Learn More: Thyme-Roasted Carrots and Parsnips Recipe

Radicchio

Those how love radicchio really love radicchio. Try growing it in your fall and winter garden to see why. Head-forming radicchio varieties are typically ready to harvest three months after planting.

Learn More: Cold-Hardy Winter Veggies to Grow

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