How to Make Mustard From Mustard Greens

This homemade condiment recipe puts a frost-beating crop to tasty use.

Mustard Seeds.jpg

DIY mustard

Garden to table goodness is not the same old grind.

Garden to table goodness is not the same old grind.

Champing at the bit to start planting in the garden? Cold-resistant and easy growers, mustard greens can be planted up to a month before the last frost date and the first wave will be ready to harvest just about the time other plants are ready to be sown.

A hardy leaf vegetable, mustard greens handle the cold. They prefer sunlight, but are shade-tolerant and can be sown directly in the garden or grown in pots. Young leaves can be harvested for use in salads or sandwiches and as they mature, the peppery greens can be prepared as one might use kale or spinach, but with an added bite. As the plant reaches full maturity, the leaves will become too bitter to eat. This is when the fun really begins.

As the weather warms and greens reach their full height of about 18”,  the plant will begin to send up tall stalks and bright yellow flowers blossom. Watch these flowers mature then wither. When the last flower has faded, the mustard seeds are ready to be harvested.

Loaded with small yellow or brown seeds, if left alone the seeds will spread quickly and new plants will sprout with such ferocity they can soon become more nuisance than crop. The long, thin pods growing from the stalks should be harvested before they split open to control excessive propagation. Crop control isn’t the only reason you’ll want to remove those seed pods.

Cut the stalk from the plant below the seed pods and gather them in a paper bag. Set the bag aside for a couple of weeks in a warm place. Once the stalks have dried and the pods begin to split open, the copious seeds can be extracted and are ready for use.

Making your own mustard from this “second crop” is surprisingly easy and once you’ve got the knack, tailoring the recipe to your taste with the addition of spices, soaking the seeds in different mediums or grinding the result anywhere from coarse whole grain to silky smooth may make your favorite condiment one that can’t be found in your local market. 

Try this basic whole-grain mustard with just a hint of sweet. Once you’ve dipped a toe into the world of DIY mustard, experiment with using beer or wine as a base. Or toy with the addition of your favorite herbs and spices.

Whole Grain Mustard

  • 1/2 cup distilled white vinegar
  • 1/4 cup hard cider
  • 1/2 cup yellow mustard seed
  • 1/4 cup brown mustard seed
  • 1 tablespoon honey
  • 1 1/2  teaspoon kosher salt
  1. Combine vinegar, cider, brown mustard seeds and yellow mustard seeds in a glass jar.
  2. Secure jar lid and soak overnight. Seed will become plump and soft.
  3. Add honey and salt and transfer into a food processor.
  4. Process until seeds break down and mustard reaches desired consistency.
  5. Return to jar, cover and keep at room temperature a couple of days before use.
  6. Store in refrigerator.

Next Up

How to Can Spaghetti Sauce

Learn how to can homemade spaghetti sauce that will allow you to savor ripe summer tomatoes all year long.

How to Can Tomatoes

Canning tomatoes is a great, easy way to preserve the season's harvest so you'll have fresh tomatoes all year long. Learn how to can tomatoes with these simple steps for the water bath canning method.

How to Freeze Okra

Okra is a Southern favorite, thanks to its heat-loving disposition. Stock up on okra in season and freeze it for later use.

How to Freeze Tomatoes From Your Garden

Extend your garden harvest by putting your tomatoes in the deep freeze.

How to Plant, Grow and Harvest Swiss Chard

Swiss chard is a colorful addition to a cool-season garden that is packed with nutrients. Learn how to plant, grow and use this surprisingly simple superfood.

Freezing Cabbage

Scratch store-bought cabbage off your grocery list—and fill your freezer with homegrown cabbage instead.

Freezing Cherry Tomatoes

Keep fresh cherry tomato flavor on your meal-time menu well beyond the garden season by preserving excess fruits in the freezer.

Canning Peppers DIY

It's easy to pack a pint of pickled peppers.

How to Freeze Corn on the Cob

Whether you're freezing your garden crop or just want to preserve the bounty from the farmers' market, this easy step-by-step guide will give you the tips you need to freeze corn on the cob.

How To Plant and Grow Kale

Kale is the darling of foodies and chefs, who put it in everything from smoothies to stir fries. Planting and growing this superfood is a cinch.

Go Shopping

Get product recommendations from HGTV editors, plus can’t-miss sales and deals.

Follow Us Everywhere

Join the party! Don't miss HGTV in your favorite social media feeds.