How to Roast Peanuts at Home

It's worth waiting for this savory, nutty treat.

Home roasting captures the flavor of freshly harvested peanuts.

It may come as a surprise to some to learn that America’s most popular nut isn’t a nut at all. Unlike actual nuts, the peanut does not grow on trees. Although the peanut plant flowers above ground, these legumes develop underground from the root and belong to the family Leguminosae, the same family as peas and beans. Growing in clusters, a single plant may yield 50 to 100 peanuts and, although most often grown commercially, the low-maintenance plant can be a fun and easy-to-grow addition to home gardens in areas able to accommodate the 140 frost-free days it takes for the fruit to mature.

When peanuts are harvested, the plants are overturned and the legumes are left to dry in the field for several days before being harvested. Once harvested, “green” (freshly picked) peanuts may have their shells removed for processing or left inside the fibrous husk. Although peanuts left in the shell have an extraordinarily long shelf life, “green” peanuts have a higher moisture content than those that have been prepared for storage.

If you’ve grown your own peanuts this year or can find “green” peanuts at your local farmers' market, boiling or roasting fresh peanuts captures that “straight from the field” flavor in a way one might not usually associate with this particular legume.

Roasting peanuts involves a lot of waiting. The peanuts must be soaked in a salty brine long enough for the flavor to reach the “nut” itself. Once brined, the peanuts must dry before roasting. And finally, even after they have been removed from the oven, they continue to cook inside the shell and must cool before serving. It’s worth the wait.

Roasted Peanuts

  • 2 pounds raw peanuts in shell
  • 2 quarts water
  • 1/2 cup kosher salt

Rinse peanuts to remove excess dirt.

In a large pot or bowl, dissolve salt in water.

Place peanuts in brine and place a plate on top of nuts to submerge.

Soak 6 hours.

Drain water, spread peanuts on 2 baking sheets in a single layer.

Allow to rest 12 hours or overnight to dry.

Roast in a 300 degree oven for 45 minutes. stirring after 20 minutes

Allow to cool before serving.

Next Up

Tips for Edible Gardening in Small Spaces

Make the most of a small garden space by mixing flowers and vegetables in an ornamental edible garden.

Culinary Lavender 101

Discover edible lavenders, along with tips on harvesting and using this pretty, fragrant herb in baking, grilling and more.

How to Grow Ginger

Learn how to plant, grow and enjoy ginger in your home garden and kitchen.

How to Harvest Sunflower Seeds

Learn when to harvest sunflower seeds and how to harvest and roast sunflower seeds for a nutritious snack straight from the backyard.

Flower Fail: Blossoms Aren’t Pretty When Zucchini Won’t Fruit

Having trouble growing zucchini in your garden? Here's one possible reason why you're getting a small yield of this popular summer squash.

How Do You Know When Carrots Are Ready to Harvest?

Size, color and timing are all factors that determine when to pick your garden carrots.

How to Build a DIY Compost Tumbler

Make a fast-burning home compost bin for under $50. One 50-gallon drum will turn your family’s food scraps into rich, usable soil before the growing season is over. Best of all, the wood base with attached caster wheels makes turning your compost in this DIY compost tumbler a cinch — no shoveling required.

How to Grow Nasturtium

Learn how to plant and care for nasturtium, an old-fashioned, easy-to-grow annual garden favorite that's beloved for its edible leaves and flowers.

How to Sterilize Canning Jars

Get step-by-step instructions on how to sterilize your canning jars — an all-important step before the canning process.

How to Grow and Care for Air Plants

These quirky plants don’t need soil, but they can’t live on air alone. Here’s what you need to know to keep them healthy.

Go Shopping

Get product recommendations from HGTV editors, plus can’t-miss sales and deals.

Follow Us Everywhere

Join the party! Don't miss HGTV in your favorite social media feeds.