9 Everyday Items That Can Help Control Household Pests

Annoyed by ants, gnats, cockroaches or other pests? (Shudder.) Here's how to vanquish them with common ingredients you likely have on hand.
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As a recent renter-turned-homeowner, one thing I took for granted in my apartment days was pest control. It was included in my rent and taken care of while I was off at work, so it never crossed my mind when I moved into my house — until I had to deal with an invasion of ants. Store-bought sprays and baits can be very effective, but what if you have pets or kids and are concerned about their safety? Or what if you want to deal with the problem now without running to the store? Before you reach for the chemicals, try these items you may already have around the house that can help keep ants, roaches, bed bugs, flies and more pests at bay.

Cleaning The Natural, Safe Way

Cleaning The Natural, Safe Way

Learn how to clean without harsh chemicals using natural cleaners like vinegar, baking soda, salt and lemon.

Vinegar

What can’t vinegar do? In addition to being a great cleaning agent, vinegar is effective in deterring many types of pests. Ants despise the smell of vinegar, and vinegar will wipe out the scent trails they leave around the house to navigate. You can also make traps for fruit flies and gnats using apple cider vinegar mixed with a few drops of dish soap. The insects will be drawn to the smell of the vinegar, but once they touch it, the soap will make it impossible for them to escape.

Catnip

Catnip is a natural cockroach deterrent. You can make a “catnip tea” by simmering catnip in water, which you can then spray in areas where you see roaches. Catnip sachets can also be effective, but avoid this method if you have cats at home.

Essential Oils

Essential oils, such as peppermint, eucalyptus and lavender, can help keep dust mites and bed bugs under control. Just mix of a few drops with water and spritz on bedding, carpets and rugs.

Salt

Kill fleas and flea eggs by sprinkling finely ground salt on your carpet, letting it sit for 24 hours and vacuuming it up. The salt dehydrates the fleas and ultimately kills them.

Vacuum Cleaner

If a swarm of ladybugs has invaded your home, the easiest way to get rid of them is with a vacuum cleaner — and you can even release them back outside if you'd like. Secure the toe end of a pair on pantyhose to your vacuum's hose attachment with a rubber band as a trap.

Citrus

Fun fact: Spiders’ taste buds are on the tips of their legs, and they hate citrus. Ergo, they won't want to walk on places soaked in citrus. Mix water with lemon or lime juice and spray around doors and windows.

Cornmeal

Don’t have any ant baits handy? Try setting out small piles of cornmeal. The ants will bring it back to the colony as food, but they can’t digest it properly, ultimately thinning their ranks. 

Petroleum Jelly

If you can see where ants or other insects are getting into your home, create a barrier with a line of petroleum jelly. You can also try chalk, cinnamon or cayenne pepper.

Mint

Mint repels all kinds of critters, including ants, flies, mosquitoes and mice. Leave small sachets of crushed mint — or even mint teabags in a pinch — around the house.

Natural Cleaners for the Kitchen + Bathroom

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Vinegar

Vinegar is by far one of the most versatile cleaning agents. Use it to remove soap scum from the shower. Mix it with borax to get rid of hard-water rings in the toilet. Tape a bag of vinegar to your showerhead and leave it overnight for an easy, sparkly clean; or add a couple of tablespoons of white vinegar to your dish soap to eliminate grease in the kitchen.

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Hydrogen Peroxide

You use your toothbrush to clean your teeth, but don’t forget about cleaning your toothbrush. Let it soak in hydrogen peroxide for a few minutes to get rid of any lingering germs. Hydrogen peroxide is also useful on many hard surfaces. Use it to scrub your toilet, trash cans, shower, mirrors and doorknob. You can even mix it with equal parts water for a safe and effective solution for mopping the bathroom and kitchen floors.

Lemons

The acid in lemons makes them a great natural cleanser. The juice is great for disinfecting kitchen countertops and cutting boards. Cut a lemon in half and scrub your bath and shower to remove soap scum. And if your shaving cream has left a rusty ring in your bathtub, use your lemon half to scrub it away.

Vodka

Do you have a mold and mildew problem in the bathroom? Skip a trip to the store, and pull out some inexpensive vodka from the liquor cabinet. Spray it directly onto the mold and mildew, and wait 15 minutes. Then use a cloth or small scrubbing brush to wipe it clean. And don’t forget to save a little for an after-cleaning celebration!

Photo By: John Foxx

Tea

More than a favorite beverage, brewed tea can be used to clean windows, mirrors and countertops. Spray on your bathroom surfaces just as you would any typical window or surface cleaner. Then, keep your bags to hide in the back of the fridge. They will actually work to deodorize it. And if you need to remove the scent of onion, garlic or fish from your hands, cut a bag open, and wash your hands with the leaves to remove the odor.

Salt

Remember that miracle lemon that cleaned the tub? If your dirt stains are particularly stubborn, add some salt to the lemon, and scrub the surface of your bathtub, sink or toilet. Once your salt solution has done the trick, just rinse off any pulp and leftover residue, leaving your bathroom perfectly clean with a lemon-fresh scent!

Baking Soda

Perfect for cleaning counters, sinks, drains, the toilet bowl, soap scum, shower doors, showerheads, and well, pretty much anything in the kitchen and bathroom, baking soda is one cleaning agent you don’t want to be without. For most kitchen and bathroom surfaces, a simple paste made of baking soda and water will do the trick.

Drain Cleaner

Though it is not a natural cleaning solution, exactly, a drain snake is an eco-friendly way to clean out the main source of drain blockage: hair. And if you don’t have a drain snake, you can still avoid pouring harsh chemicals down the bathtub drain by unwinding a wire hanger, hooking the end, pushing it down the drain as far as it will go, and pulling up hair that is keeping the water from draining properly.

Photo By: JOE MARTINEZ JR.

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