Fixer Upper: Behind the Design - The Jackson House

Chip and Jo help transform "The Ivy House" into the Jackson Home in an update that integrates two design styles and one spectacular spa bath. Look for #neverbeforeseen for rooms and elements not featured in the original Fixer Upper episode.

Photo By: Jennifer Boomer/Verbatim Photo A

Photo By: Jennifer Boomer/Verbatim Photo A

Photo By: Jennifer Boomer/Verbatim Photo A

Photo By: Jennifer Boomer/Verbatim Photo A

Photo By: Jennifer Boomer/Verbatim Photo A

Photo By: Jennifer Boomer/Verbatim Photo A

Photo By: Jennifer Boomer/Verbatim Photo A

Photo By: Jennifer Boomer/Verbatim Photo A

Photo By: Jennifer Boomer/Verbatim Photo A

Photo By: Jennifer Boomer/Verbatim Photo A

Photo By: Jennifer Boomer/Verbatim Photo A

Photo By: Jennifer Boomer/Verbatim Photo A

Team Gaines Scores Another Win

Chip and Jo, with some help from Joanna's design assistants and woodcraftsman Clint Harp, turn a plain and outdated house into a one-of-a-kind home for a family of four. 

A Little Bit Country, A Little Bit Coastal

In keeping with the clients' wishes, Joanna had to find a way to marry two distinct styles — coastal and rustic — within a single design vision. And because the couple had never been through a home renovation before, Joanna was especially challenged to achieve the perfect stylistic balance while giving the couple the just what they were looking for.

Meet the Jacksons

Gayle and Tim Jackson were relocating from Austin to Waco and looking for a house with lots of living space to acommodate friends and family. They looked at more than 20 properties before making their final choice. Tim initially leaned toward a new build, but Gayle eventually persuaded him to take on a vintage fixer-upper. In terms of their design preferences, Gayle described "a kind of beachy feel, but not just light and airy. We also like the rustic...Sort of like beach house marries Texas farmhouse."

Before

"The Ivy House" as Chip christened it — owing to the ivy vines climbing its brick exterior — was a plain and simple 1960s home with 3400 square feet inside but very limited appeal on the outside. "It's a cute, little brick house," said Joanna, "in great shape, but in need of a face-lift, especially in the master bathroom."

After

The exterior transformation is dramatic and eye-catching, with a fresh white exterior, impressive new patio and pergola, Bahama shutters and French doors for the front entrance. 

Living Room, Before

The living room was drab and dated, with an awkward layout, particularly with respect to the front entry.

Living Room, After

Focal points in the renovated space include the double-sided fireplace, exposed wood beams and arched doorways. "I really wanted to make sure that each space was defined," said Joanna, "and I really love the idea of a double-sided fireplace, two really pretty arched openings on either side of it, so there's a really nice flow, but it's not completely wide open."

Living Room, After

We've never tackled a rustic-coastal design before, but I think the result is really beautiful and welcoming. There may not be the ocean views, but this house feels like a vacation getaway.
—Joanna

Dining Room, After

What I love about the dining room is it's a nice mirrored look to what’s going on in the living room. You've got the double-sided fireplace, the beautiful beams...and the French doors that lead out to the backyard.
—Joanna

Kitchen, Before

Kitchen, After

The kitchen is another space where the dual design influences came together. The homeowners wanted to keep things bright and airy in the new kitchen but also wanted to mix in rustic elements like the brick backsplash and exposed wood. Joanna and her design assistant Gretchen had to decide whether to go with actual vintage brick pavers cut down to tile depth or new tiles made to look like brick. They ultimately opted for the real thing.

Home Office, Before

Home Office, After

The rustic influence also shines through in the home office which features antique french doors in distressed finish, floor-to-ceiling shiplap in a dark stain and sliding barn-door styhle window treatment.

Before

The plan for this roomy but nondescript upstairs space was to create a family room/game room that could double as a guest bedroom.

After

Highlights in the newly remodeled upstairs game room include custom built-in bookshelves, integrated work desk and lots of of extra storage. A focal point is the large game table that was custom created by woodcraftsman Clint Harp and includes a decorative herringbone inlay.

After

The real show-stopper in this space is the Murphy bed which is stored vertically when not in use, then folds down for when the room is serving as a guest room.

Master Bath, Before

Prior to the renovation, the master bath was drab and oddly configured around an awkwardly placed closet. "The current master bathroom is dull and it's got a weird layout, said Joanna. "I would love to transform this space into a spa-like retreat."
#neverbeforeseen

Master Bath, After

Though not featured in the original Fixer Upper episode, transforming the Jackson's master bath was one of the biggest undertaking in the renovation. 
#neverbeforeseen

Master Bath, Before

#neverbeforeseen

Master Bath, After

The space is entirely reconfigured and features a truly spa-like tub-and-shower combo, double vanity, lots of counter space and a sliding door made from antique tabletop.
#neverbeforeseen

Master Bath, After

"We've done plenty of master bathrooms in our time, but this one was a bit unique," said Joanna. "The shower and the tub are side by side, but there are no glass surrounds. The shower is large and open, almost like a private outdoor shower you might find at a beach resort.
#neverbeforeseen

Want To See More?

If you enjoyed this Behind the Design feature, be sure to check out the complete renovation gallery from the original Fixer Upper episode:  "Blending Styles: Coastal and Rustic in the Heart of Texas".

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