15 Snow Day Crafts and Activities for Kids

We know how those long, cold winter vacation days can drag on (and on, and on). Get creative with these winter break crafts and activities that are guaranteed to entertain kids aged toddler to teen.

Photo By: Emily Fazio

Photo By: Emily Fazio

Photo By: Emily Fazio

Photo By: Emily Fazio

Photo By: Emily Fazio

Photo By: Emily Fazio

Photo By: Emily Fazio

Photo By: Emily Fazio

Photo By: Emily Fazio

Photo By: Emily Fazio

Photo By: Emily Fazio

Photo By: Emily Fazio

Photo By: Emily Fazio

Photo By: Emily Fazio

Photo By: Emily Fazio

Customize a Snow Measurement Stick

Make it fun for kids to monitor snow accumulation whether you’re expecting one or 11 inches. Paint an old ruler or paint stirrer, and mark along the length in inches. They’ll keep you posted on weather conditions like little meteorologists.

Discover Snow Painting

Using watercolors or diluted acrylics on a packed surface of snow is a whole new experience for young artists. Fill a large plastic container with fresh snow, and let the kids experiment with applying and blending colors.

Master the Art of the Paper Snowflake

Coffee filters are perfect for making snowflakes. They're already round, and the filter paper is thin making it easy to cut with precision. Craft a collection of perfect white snowflakes by folding in half three times and cutting in your desired pattern. Let the kids add watercolor for a beautiful effect. Once cut, sandwich the unfolded snowflakes between wax paper layers, and iron on low heat. The heat will flatten any creases, and the wax paper makes them more durable. Hang on the window or on your Christmas tree!

Color Your Own Puzzle

Art and craft stores sell blank puzzles in a variety of sizes. Your kids can use markers and their creativity to create works of art. Take a picture of the finished artwork as a reference before disassembling.

Scoop Up Snow Ice Cream

Snow ice cream is a tasty treat that takes the edge off being snowed in. To make, mix 1/4 cup white sugar, one teaspoon vanilla and one cup milk. You can use condensed milk, but skip the white sugar. Stir in 10 cups fresh snow, mold into snowballs and roll around in sprinkles.

Make Crystal-Coated Snowflakes

You’ll only need a few things to make your own sparkly snowflakes: Pipe cleaners, one large container/cup (big enough for the snowflake to hang without touching the bottom or sides), one cup borax diluted into five cups boiling water, thread and a pencil. Twist the pipe cleaners into a snowflake shape. Attach the snowflake to thread and a pencil, so it hangs down into a container without touching the edges or bottom. Pour the borax solution into the container. Watch the crystals form on the pipe cleaners. Remove after 24 hours, and allow the snowflake to air dry.

Play Dress Up

Make one or many ice princess headbands. Help kids cut out paper shapes, and attach to a headband with hot glue.

Make Clay Beads

Make jewelry with oven-baked clay! Have your kids roll clay balls or coils for the individual beads, and help them push a pin through the center of the soft clay to create a hole for threading. Bake according to package instructions.

Make a Batch of Glue-Based Slime

Introduce slime, and they'll play throughout their whole break. Mix one tablespoon baking soda into one cup of school glue (clear or white is fine). Add one tablespoon saline (contact lens solution), and stir in a little food coloring and/or glitter. Work it with your hands as the mixture goes from being sticky to stretchy. Don’t be fooled by its appearance! This slime is very neat and clean when used on a countertop or table surface. Seal it in a bag between uses.

Create a Colorful Window Collage

Tape a piece of transparent contact paper to a window, sticky side facing inward. Have your kids trim colorful pieces of paper into various shapes, and assemble them directly on the sticky adhesive.

Decorate a Mug

Ceramic or porcelain paint pens are fun for kids of all ages. Regardless of their artistic skill level, the mugs they create will be something you cherish and use for a long time.

Try Your Hand at DIY Puffy Paint

Combine 1/2 cup flour, 1/2 cup white glue, and 1-1/2 cups shaving cream in a bowl. Divide the mixture into separate containers, and add food coloring. Scoop each color into its own sealable bag, and trim off one corner for piping. Pipe onto paper, and allow to dry.

Make Stained Glass Works of Art

While it might seem like a delicate project for small hands, you’d be surprised how easy it is for older children to grasp the concept of stained glass with a little supervision. Use the glass from a picture frame as the base. Tape off space around the edges to shield small hands from sharp areas. Attach small, smooth pieces of beach glass or colorful tiles to the surface using a multipurpose adhesive. Avoid cutting pieces of glass to fit, and encourage your kids to build a mosaic to fill the space. Once dry, mix store-bought grout for stained glass, and let them work the grout between the pieces of glass with a damp sponge.

Craft a Cardboard Dollhouse

Cut two sheets of leftover cardboard into a house shape, and trim slits into each piece, one piece from roof to center, and one upwards from the ground to center. Use a utility knife to trim out windows and doors, and attach colorful trim and accessories. Older kids may want to add "wallpaper" or apply paint to the walls. Assemble, and let them play for hours!

Become a Finger-Knitting Master

Finger knitting projects are perfect for kids in the 5-13 year range, but you’ll want to get in on the fun too! Kids will get the hang of it quickly because it's repetitive. Get inspiration from this finger- and arm-knitting gallery.

Shop This Look