17 Different Types of Clematis

We dig clematis — and know you will too. Discover exciting flower colors and plant forms, including knee-high shrubs and classic trellis-climbing vines.

Photo By: BaileyNurseries.com

Photo By: ProvenWinners.com

Photo By: PerennialResource.com

Photo By: BaileyNurseries.com

Photo By: BaileyNurseries.com

Photo By: ProvenWinners.com

Photo By: BaileyNurseries.com

Photo By: PerennialResource.com

Photo By: BaileyNurseries.com

Photo By: Doreen Wynja for Monrovia.com

Photo By: BaileyNurseries.com

Photo By: ProvenWinners.com

Photo By: BaileyNurseries.com

Photo By: ProvenWinners.com

Photo By: BaileyNurseries.com

Photo By: BaileyNurseries.com

Photo By: BaileyNurseries.com

‘The President’ Clematis

When most people think of clematis, they picture something like the luxurious, deep purple blooms of 'The President.’ This beauty is a traditional clematis vine, happy to clamber up a trellis or blanket a fence. 'The President’ opens its first flush of flowers in late spring to early summer, followed by a second blooming with smaller flowers in early autumn. Prune in late winter or early spring, cutting vines back to 6" to 9" tall. Place cuts just above a pair of strong buds. These deer- and rabbit-resistant plants grow 8' to 12' tall by 3' to 4' wide. Hardy in Zones 4-8.

Brother Stefan Clematis

Many gardeners grow clematis because they crave blue and purple colors in planting beds. Brother Stefan clematis delivers beautiful blue blooms — all summer long. It flowers on old and new growth, creating a plant that’s blanketed in blue hues. This gorgeous vine is named for Stefan Franczak, a Jesuit monk and noted horticulturist in Poland who developed many excellent clematis varieties. In early spring when buds swell, cut stems back to 3' high. Vines grow 5' to 7' tall and 4' to 6' wide — a great choice for an entry arch or tuteur in a planting bed. Hardy in Zones 4-9.

Clematis ‘Henryi’

Violet to brown tinted centers on these clematis flowers contrasts strikingly with pure white petals. The largest blossoms appear on plants in early summer, followed by smaller flowers on new stems in midsummer to early fall. Gardeners often grow 'Henryi’ as a trailing clematis at ground level, letting stems tumble along and cascade over rock walls. For best flowering, prune in late winter or early spring, cutting stems back to 6" to 9" above a pair of fat buds. Vines grow 6' to 10' tall and 3' to 6' wide. Hardy in Zones 4-8.

Claire de Lune Clematis

Some clematis flowers unfurl to reveal more than one color on each flower petal. Clair de Lune (Clematis 'EVIrin’) opens white blooms with pale, lilac-tinted shadings along wavy petal edges. Dark purple flower anthers give each blossom a contrasting center. This pretty vine, previously known as 'Blue Moon,’ is a gold winner of the Chelsea Flower Show in England for its striking 7" wide flowers. Blooms show the best color when grown in part shade. Vines grow 8' to 10' tall by 3' wide. Hardy in Zones 4 to 9.

‘Rebecca’ Clematis

Velvety red flowers with yellow centers give 'Rebecca’ clematis star power in the garden. Vines grow to a modest height (6' to 8'), which makes this clematis a good choice for a trellis, fence row or winding through shrub roses. Flower color shifts more toward purple on plants tucked into shade. To coax the reddest hue, make sure vines receive some sun during the day. Blooms measure 6" to 7" across and appear all summer long. Like all clematis, 'Rebecca’ grows best when roots are shaded and kept cool. Do this by planting it behind a shrub or using a thick mulch layer. Vines grow 6' to 8' tall by 4' wide. Hardy in Zones 4 to 10.

‘Diamond Ball’ Clematis

Some clematis varieties open flowers with twice the number of petals (double blooms). 'Diamond Ball’ unfurls cool white-blue double flowers. When fully open, the blossoms measure 4" to 5" across with a round or almost spherical shape. Expect to see flowers all summer long. In early spring, cut stems back to 18" high. Vines grow 5' to 6' tall and 2' to 3' wide — a great choice for an entry arch or a trellis in a container. Hardy in Zones 4-9.

‘Josephine’ Clematis

Introduced in 1998 at the famed Chelsea Flower Show in England, this double clematis steals the spotlight in any planting. Flowers unfurl in shades of lilac, with a lighter ruffed center. The outer, largest petals (botanically they’re called tepals) fade and drop, leaving a petal pompom in the center of blooms. Flowers last up to 4 weeks, filling the summer garden with striking color. For best flowering, remove top growth by one-third in early spring. Vines grow 6' to 8' tall by 3' wide. Grow on a trellis or fence, in a pot or through a shrub rose. Hardy in Zones 4 to 9.

‘Nelly Moser’ Clematis

Some clematis showcase bicolor blooms. One of the most well-known in this category is 'Nelly Moser.’ This beauty unfurls very big, 7" to 9" flowers in late spring and early summer, followed by a second bloom in early fall. Each blossom displays pale lilac petals with a glowing pink bar down the center. Colors tend to fade in full sun, so give 'Nelly Moser’ a spot with light shade. Flower centers sport shades of deep purple. For best flowering, remove top growth by one-third in early spring. Vines grow 6' to 10' tall by 3' wide. Grow beside a porch where you can enjoy the bicolor blossoms on a daily basis. Hardy in Zones 4 to 8.

‘Kilian Donahue’ Clematis

Many clematis breeders call 'Kilian Donahue’ one of the best bicolor types. Flowers unfurl to reveal ruby red centers that fade to fuchsia at each petal tip. Petal edges are a pretty orchid. As the flowers age, they shift to lavender with a pink stripe. Because blossoms change as they fade, when you grow 'Kilian Donahue,’ it’s like having two different clematis vines growing together. Vines flower strongly all summer long. For best flowering, remove top growth by one-third in early spring. Vines grow 9' to 10' tall by 4' wide. Hardy in Zones 4 to 10.

Evergreen Clematis

Evergreen clematis brings year-round color to gardens, and the variety known as Avalanche is no exception. This beauty offers an avalanche of snow white blooms in spring. Also known as Clematis x cartmanii 'Blaaval,’ this clematis grows best in part to full sun. Vines grow 12' to 15' tall with support and belong to Pruning Group 1. This means plants don’t typically need pruning, but if you must cut stems to help contain growth or reduce height, make cuts immediately after blooming. Hardy in Zones 7-9.

‘Duchess of Albany’ Clematis

Clematis flowers come in many shapes and sizes. 'Duchess of Albany’ features bell-shaped pink flowers with deeper pink stripes down the center of petals. It's a type of Clematis texensis or small-flowered clematis (it opens little blooms). This kind of clematis is also referred to as a late-flowering type because the first flowers start appearing in midsummer and keep opening through September in most regions. Once vines are established, they’re drought tolerant. Small-flowered clematis work well as a vine that weaves through other plantings, such as shrub roses, perennials or other shrubs. For best flowering, cut back in early spring to 6" tall. Vines grow 8' to 20' tall by 2' wide. Hardy in Zones 5 to 9.

Small-Flowered Shrub Clematis

Clematis has a shrubby side, where stems grow upright instead of twining and vining. 'Stand By Me’ clematis features a shrub form that doesn’t need a trellis, although it may benefit from a little support. Blue blooms dangle like bells, opening from late spring through midsummer. Flowers fade to form fuzzy seedheads that are eye-catching and fun. Plants grow 34" to 38" tall by 24" to 28" wide. Cut stems back in early spring to 6" tall. Hardy in Zones 3-7.

Clematis ‘Jackmanii’

This classic clematis traces its history to the 1850s, when it made its way to the United States from England. One of the most popular clematis, 'Jackmanii’ is beloved for deep purple blooms that blanket the plant from early summer into fall. To prune, in late winter or early spring cut all stems back to the previous year’s woody stems, which should be just above the base of the plant. Pruning this way helps avoid a situation later where the base of the plant becomes one bare stem with a tangle of vines above it. Vines grow 4' to 12' tall by 3' to 4' wide. Hardy in Zones 4 to 10.

Fragrant Clematis

Some clematis flowers release a sweet perfume that can scent an entire yard. 'Sweet Summer Love’ is that kind of plant. This clematis blossoms all summer long, and each bloom is filled with sweet floral fragrance. On hot humid days, the scent hangs in the air. Blossoms open a cranberry hue and shift to purple as they age. Best of all, 'Sweet Summer Love’ won’t invade your garden with unwanted seedlings (like its cousin, sweet autumn clematis). Vines grow 10' to 15' tall and 6' to 10' wide — a great choice for an entry arch or trellis beside a patio. Hardy in Zones 4-9.

Clematis recta

Discover the beauty of a bush clematis — Clematis recta. This clematis grows like a perennial, dying back to the ground each year when hard freezes arrive. White, fragrant flowers appear in late spring to early summer, followed by more blooms later in the year. In the garden, grow Clematis recta like a shrub, although stems tend to tumble over without some kind of support. Many gardeners grow this pretty clematis beside taller perennials that give it a natural, easy support. To prune, in late winter or early spring, cut all stems back to 6" to 9" above a pair of strong, healthy buds. Vines grow 2' to 4' tall and wide. Hardy in Zones 3 to 9.

Tekla Garland Clematis

Clematis breeders are working to develop smaller plants that adapt well to containers and small gardens. Tekla Garland clematis delivers. This pretty vine opens 4" to 5" wide flowers non-stop from early summer through fall. Blossoms boast a reddish-pink hue that shifts as the individual flowers age. Plants tend to be bushy and are ideal for growing in containers on a pot-size tuteur. Tuck into a spot in light shade to full sun for best flowering. To prune, in late winter or early spring, cut all stems back to 6" above the soil. Vines grow 4' to 5' tall and up to 2' wide. Hardy in Zones 4 to 9.

‘Rouge Cardinal’ Clematis

When clematis flowers fade, they form quirky mophead seedheads that look like something out of a Dr. Seuss story. Each individual stem in the mophead holds a seed at its base. As the seedheads mature, the mop "strings" become fuzzy. Clematis seedheads make a wonderful addition to dried flower creations. This clematis is 'Rouge Cardinal,’ a beautiful large-flowered pink-hued bloomer. This clematis grows best in full sun. The 5" to 7" flowers shift to purple tones when plants receive more shade. To prune, in late winter or early spring, cut all stems back to 6" above soil. the Vines grow 10' to 12' tall and up to 4' wide. Hardy in Zones 3 to 10.

Shop This Look