Tiny Luxury: 9 Things You Gain When You Go Tiny

Living tiny doesn't mean you have to rough it. See how innovative tiny home designers Tyson and Michelle Spiess pack luxurious amenities into custom compact houses measuring 250 square feet or less.

Meet the Hosts of HGTV's Tiny Luxury

Meet the Hosts of HGTV's Tiny Luxury

The Tiny Luxury crew from left to right: Brianna Francis, Jason Francis, Michelle Spiess, Tyson Spiess, Hannah Francis, Zach Francis.

From: Tiny Luxury

Photo by: Bodega Pictures

Bodega Pictures

The Tiny Luxury crew from left to right: Brianna Francis, Jason Francis, Michelle Spiess, Tyson Spiess, Hannah Francis, Zach Francis.

Tyson and Michelle Spiess, husband and wife tiny home design duo and hosts of HGTV's Tiny Luxury, pride themselves on building fully-functional tiny houses filled with all the comforts of a standard home. With the help of Michelle's two brothers and their wives, the team crafts custom compact homes using only the highest quality materials and furnishings. Their mantra: downsize, don't downgrade. Check out some of the luxurious amenities this innovative team packs into each of their gorgeous tiny houses and you might just get inspired to go tiny, too!

A Dream Kitchen

Modern Industrial Kitchen From HGTV's Tiny Luxury

Modern Industrial Kitchen From HGTV's Tiny Luxury

As seen on season 1 of Tiny Luxury , this tiny home kitchen features butcher block countertops, high gloss cabinets, stainless steel appliances and a sleek stainless steel backsplash. As an added bonus a spice rack folds down into a dining table with added storage for kitchen appliances.

From: Tiny Luxury

Photo by: Bodega Pictures

Bodega Pictures

Because a tiny house kitchen is less than half the size of a standard kitchen, splurging on high-end materials is a non-issue. Marble countertops, custom cabinetry and handmade tile backsplashes are all affordable when you only need a few feet of each. In this gorgeous modern space, clients requested butcher block countertops, stainless steel appliances and a sleek stainless steel tile backsplash. 

And Speaking of Kitchens...

Small-Space Amenities From HGTV's Tiny Luxury

Small-Space Amenities From HGTV's Tiny Luxury

As seen on season 1 of HGTV's Tiny Luxury , this gorgeous white kitchen features a granite slab countertop, large picture window, hidden dishwasher, washer and dryer duo and more.

From: Tiny Luxury

Photo by: Bodega Pictures

Bodega Pictures

Really cool features like this hidden dishwasher and combined washer and dryer are totally feasible and affordable options. Although it doesn't look like it, this dishwasher can hold up to 7 place settings and 4 large pots and pans.

Lots of Natural Light

Cozy Master Loft From Tiny Luxury

Cozy Master Loft From Tiny Luxury

As seen on season 1 of Tiny Luxury , a private master loft features a cozy queen bed and a skylight that offers a view of the stars.

From: Tiny Luxury

Photo by: Bodega Pictures

Bodega Pictures

Due to heating and cooling costs, picture windows or skylights often aren't budget-friendly options in a standard home. But in a tiny home, large windows not only aid in air circulation, but make the space feel larger and more open. So you can lay back, watch the stars and sleep soundly knowing you won't have to pay an electricity bill. 

A Spa-Like Bathroom

Spa-Like Bathroom From Tiny Luxury

Spa-Like Bathroom From Tiny Luxury

As seen on season 1 of Tiny Luxury , this spacious, spa-like bathroom features a galvanized horse trough soaking tub, vessel sink and lots of natural light.

From: Tiny Luxury

Photo by: Bodega Pictures

Bodega Pictures

Who doesn't dream of relaxing in a warm bath at the end of the day? This luxurious tiny bathroom features a full-sized galvanized soaking tub, a relaxing station, spa shower, vessel sink and high-end industrial vanity lights. 

Real Wood Accents

Cozy Kitchen and Guest Loft From Tiny Luxury

Cozy Kitchen and Guest Loft From Tiny Luxury

As seen on season 1 of Tiny Luxury , this gorgeous tiny home kitchen is filled with top-of-the-line amenities such as black granite countertops, a 4-burner gas range, full-sized stainless steel refrigerator and red oak hardwood floors. A cozy guest loft is situated just above a full bath hidden from view by a handmade wood sliding door.

From: Tiny Luxury

Photo by: Bodega Pictures

Bodega Pictures

Because a tiny home is built to hit the road, choosing durable, top-of-the-line materials like real hardwood floors, trim and beams is a must. "With less square footage, you need materials that will hold up to constant use," says Tyson. This luxury tiny home features knotty alder pine trim and beams, red oak hardwood floors and a handcrafted oak staircase.

An Ultra-Cozy Bedroom

Bright and Spacious Master Bedroom From Tiny Luxury

Bright and Spacious Master Bedroom From Tiny Luxury

As seen on season 1 of Tiny Luxury , this master bedroom loft features a vaulted ceiling, king size bed and 46" of head room. Three windows and a large skylight brighten the 56-square-foot space and give it a luxurious, spacious feel.

From: Tiny Luxury

Photo by: Bodega Pictures

Bodega Pictures

Although you may not enjoy a lot of head space in a tiny house master bedroom, its lofted design and deluge of bright windows offer a quiet, cozy sleeping experience unrivaled by a typical bedroom. 

Custom Furniture

Multi-Purpose Living Room From HGTV''s Tiny Luxury

Multi-Purpose Living Room From HGTV''s Tiny Luxury

As seen on season 1 of Tiny Luxury , a custom-built leather sofa in this cozy living room is the perfect place for a family of five to relax and watch a movie. The space also features hardwood floors, industrial sconce light fixtures and a sliding wall that expands to reveal a bedroom.

From: Tiny Luxury

Photo by: Bodega Pictures

Bodega Pictures

Because you'll likely need only one or two pieces, ordering handmade, custom furniture like this sleek brown leather sofa is a luxury you can definitely afford.

High-End Light Fixtures

Industrial Vintage-Style Light Fixture From Tiny Luxury

Industrial Vintage-Style Light Fixture From Tiny Luxury

As seen on season 1 of Tiny Luxury , this 140-square-foot home was filled with high-end, industrial-style caged light fixtures at a fraction of what it would cost to outfit a standard-sized house. Perks!

From: Tiny Luxury

Photo by: Bodega Pictures

Bodega Pictures

Filling a standard-sized home with these chic, handmade industrial light fixtures would cost thousands of dollars. But because a tiny home requires only a handful, these statement pieces can be integrated into your design at a fraction of the cost.

And the Most Luxurious Amenity?

High-End Cedar Tiny Home From Tiny Luxury

High-End Cedar Tiny Home From Tiny Luxury

As seen on season 1 of Tiny Luxury , this high-end tiny home measures 33 feet long by 8.5 feet wide and is packed with luxurious features. The sleek modern exterior features clear cedar siding, tinted minimalist windows, an alternating shed roof and an accordion window wall that leads to a cozy outdoor seating area.

From: Tiny Luxury

Photo by: Bodega Pictures

Bodega Pictures

As one client put it, "Living in a tiny home is freedom. Freedom from rent, freedom from stuff and the freedom to get up and go."

Tiny Houses: Living Large in a Small Space

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Small House Movement

The small house movement started roughly a decade ago, but the economic crisis rapidly accelerated its growth as people began to re-evaluate their lifestyles, craving the simplicity that comes with scaling down. At a fraction of the average house price (some a mere $20,000), these structures eliminate the hassle and potential pitfalls of a mortgage. Plus, they force their occupants to pare down their belongings to the essentials and devise innovative solutions to make the most of every inch.

©Tumbleweed Tiny House Company

Architectural Details

Just because a home is Lilliputian doesn't mean it has to be devoid of character. There may not be much room for frills on the inside, but the outside can have all of the flourishes that highlight a more traditional home, such as a gable, dormers, turned posts and railings or a decorative roof.

©Tumbleweed Tiny House Company

Carefully Chosen Furnishings

Those who inhabit tiny houses don't have the luxury of expansive sofas, clusters of chairs and nests of tables, so what they do have needs to count. Tucked into a bright, sunlit nook, this chair can act as a solo reading retreat, a spot for guests to sit, a perch for doing office work on the computer and much more.

©Tumbleweed Tiny House Company

Mobility

Tiny houses redefine the term "mobile home." For lifelong nomads, one of the most enticing factors of these structures is their potential for portability — many are outfitted with wheels that allow them to be pulled behind a vehicle then parked at the next destination.

©Tumbleweed Tiny House Company

Indoor-Outdoor Connections

Because interior square footage is so limited, outdoor spaces become an integral part of a tiny home's living area. Patios, gardens and other alfresco spots help to expand the amount of usable space. In this beachfront house, a wall of sliding doors opens directly to the sand, lending the illusion of ample room.

©Tumbleweed Tiny House Company

Modular and Folding Furniture

Furnishings that can be collapsed or tucked away when they're not in use give a small home the flexibility it needs. The drop leaf on this table, which sits snug with the wall so as not to waste floor area, folds up or down depending on the homeowners' needs.

©Tumbleweed Tiny House Company

Efficient Storage

When square footage shrinks, it's time to get creative, as those who live in scaled-down houses know all too well. Every inch is an opportunity — for example, shallow drawers tucked into these cabinet toe kicks might hold dish towels and sponges, table linens, utensils and more.

©Tammy Strobel

Petite Appliances

Full-size ranges, double-bowl sinks and side-by-side refrigerators simply won't fit. In their place: mini versions that don't hog space, such as this two-burner stove stacked on top of an oven (with storage tucked behind, to boot).

©Tammy Strobel

Slimmed-Down Structural Elements

In a tiny house, there's no room for a sweeping staircase, broad beams or heavy railings. Instead, homeowners rely on the bare minimum. For example, this narrow staircase tucked against the wall provides access to the sleeping loft without swallowing excess space.

©Matthew Wolpe

Lofts

Maximizing vertical space in a tiny home is crucial. Enter the loft, which often is used as a sleeping area — some have built-in beds that fold up during the day to make room for an office or play area, and others hold inflatable mattresses or futons.

©Tammy Strobel

Reflective Surfaces

Mirrors, aluminum, stainless steel and other shiny elements help to bounce light around, which makes a tiny home feel bigger. Diamond-plate walls amplify the light streaming in from the window in this compact shower, preventing it from feeling cramped (even if it means giving up a bit of privacy).

©Tumbleweed Tiny House Company

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