European Whimsy + Sustainability Meld in This Atlanta Home

Stacy Borocz of etúHome infuses every inch of her space with clever continental charisma that makes maximum use of her materials. Take a tour.

May 27, 2020
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Photo By: Alea Moore

Photo By: Alea Moore

Photo By: Alea Moore

Photo By: Alea Moore

Photo By: Alea Moore

Photo By: Alea Moore

Photo By: Alea Moore

Photo By: Alea Moore

Photo By: Alea Moore

Photo By: Alea Moore

Photo By: Alea Moore

Photo By: Alea Moore

Photo By: Alea Moore

Photo By: Alea Moore

Photo By: Alea Moore

Photo By: Alea Moore

Photo By: Alea Moore

Photo By: Alea Moore

Photo By: Alea Moore

Photo By: Alea Moore

Living History

Stacy Borocz, founder and president of lifestyle brand etúHome, approaches style and sustainability by thinking about the way we kept house centuries ago — and quite literally, by bringing the objects of the past into modern spaces. That sensibility has struck a chord with customers and fellow tastemakers alike who clamor for Borocz's unique home goods like etúHome’s handsome reclaimed-wood charcuterie boards. Borocz's own Atlanta home is full of the elegant and utilitarian pieces her Budapest team sources and crafts from hand. In her soulful space, salvaged remnants of demolished buildings, venerable antiques and contemporary handiwork harmonize beautifully — and every piece has a story.

Wonder While You Work

Borocz's work area enjoys perpetual inspiration from a Daydream Believer art print by her friend Rebecca Puig who, along with her husband Rick, "are proprietors of a company called Sugarboo & Co. and they offer this as part of their collection," Borocz says. "It just made me smile when I first saw it and I am certain I grin to myself every time I walk into my office. What more could one ask for?"

Artistic Inheritance

Family history contributes to the kaleidoscopic collection of paintings in Borocz's office — and to the way she acquires pieces throughout her home. "I had the good fortune of growing up with a great uncle that was an art dealer in Palm Beach," she explains. "I was fascinated with his craft, knowledge and great eye. My gallery wall is a collection of oils on canvas from him as well as some newer additions I personally selected over the years. From him I learned that European gallery auctions, brocante [flea market] discoveries and antique fairs are wonderful places to source special finds. He always said 'art is personal, if you love it, hang it.'"

Finders Keepers

This trio of solid oak apothecary chests with porcelain knobs and hand-painted porcelain labels dates back to the late 1800s. "They originally lined the wall of a tiny pharmacy in Budapest," Borocz says. "The building was being renovated several years ago and when we went in to salvage the wood beams, we ended up buying the entire contents: the wall units, hundreds of amber pharmacy bottles, mortar bowls and all. Our factory restored all the units and, in the end, I just couldn't part with these particular ones. They are so rich in history that you can actually find signatures and dates on the bottom of the drawers from each apprentice that studied and worked there throughout the years."

Portrait Wall

Borocz commissioned the hand-painted ornamental plates in her foyer from artisans in Italy, then offered them as a limited-edition series through etúHome. The serene hue on the wall is Sherwin-Williams's Greystone, and she liked it so much she employed it throughout the first floor. "I chose it because I see blue undertones in it, and I prefer a blue-grey versus a green-grey," she says.

Function + Beauty

The mostly-monochrome bathroom features touches of petal pink — a trio of coffee table books, a ceramic bowl and an issue of Veranda with a floral cover — in a glass-shelved cabinet. A graduated array of jars on the top shelf are both ornamental and functional: they make the jars that are in active use (with contents like cotton swabs and bath salts) feel more decorative.

Awash in Sunlight

The rustic ladder called into duty as a towel rack was once used at apple-picking time in a French orchard; the antique wooden bowl displaying amber and clear glass toiletries on Borocz's round stool began life as a place to make and knead dough. Warm gray paint on the vanity complements the wide tiles she chose for the floor.

Personal Picks

Who can imagine where the DIY projects we undertake now might find themselves in a century? Jazz Age do-it-yourselfers assembled the botanical art above Borocz's bar area. "They are part of a collection of pressed flowers and leaves — which was quite the hobby of aristocratic ladies in the early to mid-1900s," she says. "I love the history here and that each piece is unique."

Casual Nook

A faceted and weathered pedestal bowl with violet pansies presides over a white reclaimed-wood pedestal table studded with distressed nail head accents in the breakfast area. Warm, walnut-toned dining chairs complement the hardwood floor and provide contrast with the pale window treatments and corner seats beside them.

Piece by Piece

The white upholstered corner seats between the windows and the breakfast area were part of a sectional set that Borocz deconstructed. "They are fab and fun because you can move them together or apart as you change up a room," she says. That suits her appetite for revision: "I tend to gravitate to pieces that have dual functionality because I am constantly changing my space."

Rustic Chic

These table settings are all about layering: Borocz started with woven-rush chargers layered with striped linen napkins, then stacked trios of hand-dipped, exposed-edge dishes from her European clay collection and topped them with casually lovely floral napkins.

Mixed Media

None of the century-old, deep blue ceramic jars in the living room's built-in shelves are fully alike. "They are from the southwest of France near Toulouse, and are part of a larger collection," Borocz says. "Old European vessels are typically a generational item, so since they traded hands so many times over the years; the tops end up being mixed and matched or refreshed by their various owners." That spirit carries over to the coffee table and its changing cast of characters. "That is one accent piece I change all the time," she explains. "I am an avid collector of design books, so I am always sorting new with old based on what I am reading at the time."

Tough Beauties

The mirrors above the fireplace might seem precariously placed, but they're far more durable than they look: they're actually hand-forged steel. Teal tones in the distressed rug pair beautifully with Borocz's tabletop glass and ceramics. More books from her design library sit alongside mirrors and plants on her gleaming white mantel.

Perfectly Imperfect

The rest of the sectional couch resides in Borocz's living room. There, vases on the occasional tables echo the vivid blue tones of the French jar collection in the living room (a color that "gets me every single time I glance at them," she says). The blown-glass orbs in the pedestal bowl are part of etúHome’s sphere vase collection. Borocz particularly loves their unstructured tops, "which is where the glass was cut from the metal rod used to blow the orb," she explains.

Found Flutes

Borocz's Champagne service channels the je ne sais quoi of continental entertainers with etched glasses sourced from regional producers across France. They stand on a signature charcuterie board finished with a black wax design originally created by folk artist Diane Kappa.

A Space for Celebration

Given the ample tables and gathering areas in Borocz's home, it's easy to imagine it packed to the rafters on a regular basis. Not quite, she says — and unsurprisingly, she has very European preferences. "While I always love a good party, I actually prefer smaller, more intimate dinners with meals focused on conversation versus time. These are always the dinners that start early and end way later than planned." That said, she has gone above and beyond for special occasions. "Recently I hosted an engagement party for my son and new daughter-in-law with 150 people, and yes, the house was very full!"

Farmhouse Festivities

This five-pillared dining table is a sibling to the smaller piece in Borocz's breakfast nook. This space might seem more contemporary and eclectic than the rest of her home, given its art and gleaming glassware, but there is such a thing as too contemporary for her: "that would be items considered midcentury modern," she says. "I am not a fan."

Partners in Design

Borocz is quick to note that she can't take credit for her striking black walnut dining chairs that her husband (and business partner) masterminded. "He worked diligently with the factory to create them, and it turns out they are a best-seller and a designer favorite," she says.

Island Utility

Borocz's kitchen island features a hand-forged, removable steel bar with S-hooks for posts and pans. "I love grabbing what I need right in front of me versus digging through drawers to find the right size [vessel]," she says. The Spanish woven-rush baskets beneath the countertop store French linens — "another guilty pleasure," Borocz says.

Creating Special Occasions

From storage and serveware to humble table settings, Borocz loves using the items in her home to make her guests feel cherished. "Who wouldn't enjoy pulling up a chair and unfolding a perfectly pressed linen napkin or noticing a single flower placed just right atop a china plate? A beautifully appointed table says, 'I appreciate that you are here, your attendance is important to me, thank you for coming.'"

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