Freezing Cherry Tomatoes

Keep fresh cherry tomato flavor on your meal-time menu well beyond the garden season by preserving excess fruits in the freezer.
Basket of Ripe Red Cherry Tomatoes

Basket of Ripe Red Cherry Tomatoes

Tomatoes, potatoes, and lettuces are veggies that should be planted in late winter or early spring. Sow seeds under cover and transplant outside after the final frost.

©2011, Dorling Kindersley Limited

2011, Dorling Kindersley Limited

Cherry tomatoes can be one of your garden’s most prolific plants. These vines pump out fruits by the handful, and if you grow the varieties ‘Sweet 100’ or ‘Sweet Million,’ well, prepare for a deluge of sun-ripened sweetness. To preserve that summer flavor, consider freezing cherry tomatoes. By freezing these marble-size gems, you’ll have summer-fresh taste no matter the season. 

Tomatoes are one of the few items from your backyard vegetable patch that you can freeze without blanching. For full-size tomatoes, just core fruits and toss into zipper bags—you don’t even have to dip into boiling water to remove skins. Cherry tomatoes are even easier. Wash and dry, place on a cookie sheet, and slide it in the freezer. When the tiny globes are frozen solid, toss them into a container or zipper bag.

Frozen cherry tomatoes are no longer fit for traditional tossed salad, but you can blend them with oil and vinegar to create a flavorful dressing. Or blend them with pesto and dried, homegrown oregano and toss with pasta. Frozen cherry tomatoes make a nice complement to roasted meats, rice, and casseroles. They’re also a natural fit for soups and stews.

Freeze Vegetables From Your Garden

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Fresh Broccoli Beats Store-Bought Every Time

Want to enjoy fresh-from-the-garden broccoli all year long? It's a snap to freeze this fiber-rich veggie to use in stir fries, soup and more. Learn the process for how to freeze broccoli in this article by Julie A. Martens.

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Overwhelmed with Cucumbers?

Cucumber vines can be prolific producers of the treasured summertime veggie. Don't think it's possible to freeze cucumbers? Well, the secret lies in the preparation. Learn how to freeze cucumbers for summer-fresh fare in any season.

©2012, Dorling Kindersley Limited

Never Have Too Many Cherry Tomatoes

While frozen cherry tomatoes are no longer fit to be used in tossed salads, you can blend them with herbs or use in soups and stew. In this article, Julie A. Martens offers several great uses for frozen cherry tomatoes and describes the best way to preserve them.

©2011, Dorling Kindersley Limited

Freeze Spinach for Soups and More

While you won't want to serve frozen spinach in fresh salads, the leaves will work nicely in soup, casseroles and stir fries. You'll just want to freeze young leaves. Avoid the older or yellowing leaves as they'll produce a nasty taste and rubbery texture. Ever tried making frozen spinach cubes? Get more tips on how to freeze spinach in this article on how to freeze spinach.

©2011, Dorling Kindersley Limited

Can You Freeze Kale?

Yes, you can freeze kale. Frozen kale works well in smoothies and blends well into quiches, crock pot stews and soups. Find more uses for frozen kale and how to best preserve this nutrient-packed green.

©2011, Dorling Kindersley Limited

Put Your Onions in the Deep Freeze

Too many onions to eat right away? Not a problem. They freeze easily, and can be used in a variety of ways. Learn how to prep onions for safe storage in the deep freeze, how to keep the onion odor low and when to use frozen onions in your dishes.  

©2011, Dorling Kindersley Limited

Freeze Asparagus for Great Flavor

While frozen asparagus spears won't be as crisp as garden-fresh stems, they can still be used in many dishes. Here are the steps to preserving this nutrient-dense vegetable and some ideas on how to use frozen asparagus to add flavor to your meals.

©2013, Image courtesy of Ben Rollins

Can You Freeze Garlic Cloves?

You definitely can freeze garlic. In fact, you can freeze garlic in many ways. While frozen garlic lacks the crunchy texture of fresh, the flavor remains strong—and definitely won't have the chemical taste that sometimes accompanies jarred garlic. Learn several ways to freeze garlic and how to use it to add flavor to food.

©2010, How to Grow Practically Everything, Dorling Kindersley Limited

How Do You Freeze Eggplant?

Eggplant doesn't keep very long, and you won't be able to can it without pulverizing it beyond recognition. So, how do you preserve your delicious eggplant? Forget your canner and learn how to freeze eggplant. Here are several freezing methods you can try.

©2012, Dorling Kindersley Limited

Enjoy a Summertime Favorite All Year

Learn how to freeze corn and you'll be able to enjoy this summertime treat all year—even with your holiday turkey. Freezing corn is simple, and it's a great way to introduce kids to food preservation. Learn the steps to freezing corn in this article by Julie A. Martens.

©2011, Dorling Kindersley Limited

How to Freeze Brussels Sprouts

Brussels sprouts bring more than taste to the table. This cabbage cousin boasts vitamins and is high in protein, so you'll want to make your locally-grown Brussels sprouts last. Learn the two ways to freeze Brussels sprouts and ways to include this frozen super veggie on your table.

©2011, Dorling Kindersley Limited

Steps to Freezing Cabbage

Want to enjoy the nutrition offered by cabbage all year? This unsung hero of the vegatable garden adapts well to the freezing process. Start with dense, solid heads that feel weighty for their size. Learn more about the steps to freezing cabbage in this article from Julie A. Martens.

©2010, DK - How to Grow Practically Everything , Dorling Kindersley Limited

Freeze Celery for Soups

Celery is mostly water, and the freezing process ruptures cell walls, resulting in a limp, mushy product. But frozen celery works fabulously in casseroles, sauces, stock, and other hot concoctions. You can also use it as an aromatic with soups, broths for cooking rice, or roasts, tossing after cooking. Learn the steps to freezing celery in this article.

©2011, Dorling Kindersley Limited

Overstocked on Mushrooms?

Mushrooms might last about a week in the refrigerator, which might not be enough time to enjoy the bounty you may have grown or foraged. Consider freezing mushrooms. Learn which method of freezing mushrooms works best, and get some ideas for how to use them in recipes.

©2010, How to Grow Practically Everything, Dorling Kindersley Limited

Cherry tomatoes produce a wonderful slow-roasted product that enhances any dish with up-town flavor. To slow roast, wash and slice fruits, and lay them out on a parchment-lined baking sheet, cut side up. You can scoop out the juicy seeds with a melon baller—or not. Sometimes seeds become bitter when roasted. It really depends on your tastebuds.

Drizzle a little olive oil over the tomatoes, followed by a sprinkle of kosher salt, a grind of pepper, and whatever herbs you have on hand—fresh thyme or oregano work well, as does fennel seed. Lastly, mince garlic onto the tomatoes. Use as much as your family loves. Pop the pan into a 300-degree oven.

Check the tomatoes at the 30-minute mark. They should be done in an hour—possibly a little longer if you kept the juicy innards. Freeze roasted cherry tomatoes in containers or zipper bags. Add them to homemade pizza, pasta sauce, omelets, or home-baked bread.

Freezing cherry tomatoes is something you can do throughout the growing season—whenever the harvest is heavier than your family can consume. If you garden where frost arrives, take care when freezing cherry tomatoes at the end of the growing season. Tomato skins start to toughen when temperatures dip below 50 degrees F. After freezing, plan to puree late-season cherry tomatoes to break up skins.

The best part about freezing cherry tomatoes is too tough to call. It may be that you’re including the nutrient-packed skin in your dinner menus. If you grow an antioxidant-enriched variety like ‘Indigo Rose’ or lycopene-laden, orange-skinned ‘Sun Sugar’, you’ll definitely be consuming higher nutrient levels than with other cherry tomatoes. Or it may be the best part of freezing cherry tomatoes is that you can enjoy summer-fresh flavor in places like Buffalo and the Twin Cities even in the heart of snowy January.

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