Freezing Cabbage

Scratch store-bought cabbage off your grocery list—and fill your freezer with homegrown cabbage instead.
How to Freeze Cabbage

How to Freeze Cabbage

Close up of Spring Cabbage

©2010, DK - How to Grow Practically Everything , Dorling Kindersley Limited

2010, DK - How to Grow Practically Everything , Dorling Kindersley Limited

Can you freeze cabbage? You sure can. This leafy vegetable is versatile in the kitchen and adapts well to the freezing process. Families who grow cabbage count on it for year-round nutrition that’s easily incorporated into meal-time menus. Learn all you need to know to start freezing cabbage.

Cabbage is one of the unsung heroes of the vegetable garden. It’s packed with good-for-you nutrition, blending high fiber content with low calories. It also boasts disease-fighting compounds, high levels of Vitamins C and K, and a host of minerals. Freezing cabbage makes it possible to have this nutrient-rich vegetable available beyond the growing season.

Start with dense, solid heads that feel weighty for their size. Look for good color in the leaves, which should be fresh, not dingy or yellow. If you’re buying cabbage at a farmers’ market, ask when heads were picked so you know how fresh they are. In your own garden, harvest heads early in the morning during hot weather. If possible, wait until closer to frost to pick heads.

The first step in freezing cabbage is washing heads. Fresh-from-the-garden cabbage frequently hosts cabbage loopers or other caterpillars beneath outer leaves. Aphids, beetles, or earwigs may also be hiding inside leaves. Give hitchhikers cause to leave by soaking heads in a salt solution. Use 1 to 3 tablespoons of salt per gallon of water, and soak cabbage heads for half an hour. You can also soak heads in plain water for a few hours.

After soaking, rinse heads, and remove old or yellow outer leaves. Cut cabbage into quarters or wedges, or separate leaves. Choose how to cut heads based on your end use. For most cooked dishes, cabbage wedges are handy. Keep the core inside wedges; it helps hold leaves together during blanching.

Freezing cabbage without blanching is possible; you’ll just need to use it within 4 to 8 weeks. For the longest-lasting frozen cabbage, blanch wedges for 90 seconds. Use a colander to drain wedges after removing them from ice water.

Freeze Vegetables From Your Garden

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Fresh Broccoli Beats Store-Bought Every Time

Want to enjoy fresh-from-the-garden broccoli all year long? It's a snap to freeze this fiber-rich veggie to use in stir fries, soup and more. Learn the process for how to freeze broccoli in this article by Julie A. Martens.

©2013, Image courtesy of Ben Rollins

Overwhelmed with Cucumbers?

Cucumber vines can be prolific producers of the treasured summertime veggie. Don't think it's possible to freeze cucumbers? Well, the secret lies in the preparation. Learn how to freeze cucumbers for summer-fresh fare in any season.

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Never Have Too Many Cherry Tomatoes

While frozen cherry tomatoes are no longer fit to be used in tossed salads, you can blend them with herbs or use in soups and stew. In this article, Julie A. Martens offers several great uses for frozen cherry tomatoes and describes the best way to preserve them.

©2011, Dorling Kindersley Limited

Freeze Spinach for Soups and More

While you won't want to serve frozen spinach in fresh salads, the leaves will work nicely in soup, casseroles and stir fries. You'll just want to freeze young leaves. Avoid the older or yellowing leaves as they'll produce a nasty taste and rubbery texture. Ever tried making frozen spinach cubes? Get more tips on how to freeze spinach in this article on how to freeze spinach.

©2011, Dorling Kindersley Limited

Can You Freeze Kale?

Yes, you can freeze kale. Frozen kale works well in smoothies and blends well into quiches, crock pot stews and soups. Find more uses for frozen kale and how to best preserve this nutrient-packed green.

©2011, Dorling Kindersley Limited

Put Your Onions in the Deep Freeze

Too many onions to eat right away? Not a problem. They freeze easily, and can be used in a variety of ways. Learn how to prep onions for safe storage in the deep freeze, how to keep the onion odor low and when to use frozen onions in your dishes.  

©2011, Dorling Kindersley Limited

Freeze Asparagus for Great Flavor

While frozen asparagus spears won't be as crisp as garden-fresh stems, they can still be used in many dishes. Here are the steps to preserving this nutrient-dense vegetable and some ideas on how to use frozen asparagus to add flavor to your meals.

©2013, Image courtesy of Ben Rollins

Can You Freeze Garlic Cloves?

You definitely can freeze garlic. In fact, you can freeze garlic in many ways. While frozen garlic lacks the crunchy texture of fresh, the flavor remains strong—and definitely won't have the chemical taste that sometimes accompanies jarred garlic. Learn several ways to freeze garlic and how to use it to add flavor to food.

©2010, How to Grow Practically Everything, Dorling Kindersley Limited

How Do You Freeze Eggplant?

Eggplant doesn't keep very long, and you won't be able to can it without pulverizing it beyond recognition. So, how do you preserve your delicious eggplant? Forget your canner and learn how to freeze eggplant. Here are several freezing methods you can try.

©2012, Dorling Kindersley Limited

Enjoy a Summertime Favorite All Year

Learn how to freeze corn and you'll be able to enjoy this summertime treat all year—even with your holiday turkey. Freezing corn is simple, and it's a great way to introduce kids to food preservation. Learn the steps to freezing corn in this article by Julie A. Martens.

©2011, Dorling Kindersley Limited

How to Freeze Brussels Sprouts

Brussels sprouts bring more than taste to the table. This cabbage cousin boasts vitamins and is high in protein, so you'll want to make your locally-grown Brussels sprouts last. Learn the two ways to freeze Brussels sprouts and ways to include this frozen super veggie on your table.

©2011, Dorling Kindersley Limited

Steps to Freezing Cabbage

Want to enjoy the nutrition offered by cabbage all year? This unsung hero of the vegatable garden adapts well to the freezing process. Start with dense, solid heads that feel weighty for their size. Learn more about the steps to freezing cabbage in this article from Julie A. Martens.

©2010, DK - How to Grow Practically Everything , Dorling Kindersley Limited

Freeze Celery for Soups

Celery is mostly water, and the freezing process ruptures cell walls, resulting in a limp, mushy product. But frozen celery works fabulously in casseroles, sauces, stock, and other hot concoctions. You can also use it as an aromatic with soups, broths for cooking rice, or roasts, tossing after cooking. Learn the steps to freezing celery in this article.

©2011, Dorling Kindersley Limited

Overstocked on Mushrooms?

Mushrooms might last about a week in the refrigerator, which might not be enough time to enjoy the bounty you may have grown or foraged. Consider freezing mushrooms. Learn which method of freezing mushrooms works best, and get some ideas for how to use them in recipes.

©2010, How to Grow Practically Everything, Dorling Kindersley Limited

Quick-freeze cabbage individually on a cookie sheet. Cabbage should freeze in 12 to 24 hours, depending on how large your wedges are. After it’s frozen, toss wedges into freezer bags in bulk. Before sealing, remove as much air as possible from bags. With this method, you can grab a handful of cabbage for a pot of vegetable soup, or fish out enough cabbage to make sautéed cabbage and onions for the whole family.

You can also place blanched cabbage into individual packages prior to freezing. Use freezer bags and fill them with appropriate serving-size portions. Don’t forget to remove as much air as possible before sealing bags. A vacuum sealer system works well for removing air. For the most efficient freezing, don’t over-pack bags, but keep cabbage pieces in a single layer.

For best quality, use frozen cabbage within nine to 14 months. Use frozen cabbage as a stand-alone side dish, such as skillet cabbage and onions or stewed cabbage. Or add it to homemade soups and cozy crock pot stews. You can also freeze cole slaw with a vinaigrette-type dressing. Search for recipes online, and try them out on your family before planning to freeze a large batch.

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Sun-ripened flavors are one of gardening's simple joys. Learn how to freeze fresh vegetables to enjoy the goodness all year long.

Freezing Brussels Sprouts

It’s worth freezing this cabbage cousin when you have homegrown or locally raised versions that boast frost-kissed sweetness.

Freezing Pumpkins

Fill your freezer with healthy portions of everyone’s autumn favorite: the pumpkin. Learn how easy it is to freeze this superfood.

Freezing Onions

Extend your onion harvest by tossing excess bulbs in the freezer. Learn how to prep onions for safe storage in the deep freeze.

Freezing Green Onions

It’s easy and prolific, but what’s a gardener to do with all those green onions? Discover a few easy ways to freeze scallions.

Freezing Asparagus

Preserve the garden-fresh flavor of this spring vegetable by stashing spears in the freezer.

Cabbage Rolls Recipe

This comfort food classic makes great use of cool-weather cabbage.

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Stick to your ribs goodness awaits with this savory recipe.

Freezing Cherry Tomatoes

Keep fresh cherry tomato flavor on your meal-time menu well beyond the garden season by preserving excess fruits in the freezer.

Freezing Eggplant

Homegrown eggplant is delicious and then some. When you have more than you can eat, learn how to freeze eggplant for later use.