Freezing Green Onions

It’s easy and prolific, but what’s a gardener to do with all those green onions? Discover a few easy ways to freeze scallions.
How to Freeze Green Onions

How to Freeze Green Onions

Detail of fresh picked spring onions.

©2013, HGTV/Scripps Networks, LLC. All Rights Reserved.

2013, HGTV/Scripps Networks, LLC. All Rights Reserved.

Whether you call them scallions or green onions, these onion cousins are cool-season favorites in the garden. This easy-grows-it vegetable provides a quick return—you’ll harvest in a few weeks when you plant sets (tiny onion-looking bulbs). When the crop comes in, don’t give your scallions away. Freezing green onions is a viable option for preserving this pungent veggie.

You can freeze every part of the plant: the leafy green tops, the white bulb end, and the stem in between. After freezing, the texture changes somewhat. Stem and bulb portions become soft, while the green parts sometimes become tough. The best way to use all portions after freezing is in cooking. Adding frozen scallions to soups, stews, and sauces brings on light, just-right onion flavor. They also work well when added to butters and cream cheese to create oniony spreads.

Freeze Vegetables From Your Garden

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Fresh Broccoli Beats Store-Bought Every Time

Want to enjoy fresh-from-the-garden broccoli all year long? It's a snap to freeze this fiber-rich veggie to use in stir fries, soup and more. Learn the process for how to freeze broccoli in this article by Julie A. Martens.

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Overwhelmed with Cucumbers?

Cucumber vines can be prolific producers of the treasured summertime veggie. Don't think it's possible to freeze cucumbers? Well, the secret lies in the preparation. Learn how to freeze cucumbers for summer-fresh fare in any season.

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Never Have Too Many Cherry Tomatoes

While frozen cherry tomatoes are no longer fit to be used in tossed salads, you can blend them with herbs or use in soups and stew. In this article, Julie A. Martens offers several great uses for frozen cherry tomatoes and describes the best way to preserve them.

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Freeze Spinach for Soups and More

While you won't want to serve frozen spinach in fresh salads, the leaves will work nicely in soup, casseroles and stir fries. You'll just want to freeze young leaves. Avoid the older or yellowing leaves as they'll produce a nasty taste and rubbery texture. Ever tried making frozen spinach cubes? Get more tips on how to freeze spinach in this article on how to freeze spinach.

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Can You Freeze Kale?

Yes, you can freeze kale. Frozen kale works well in smoothies and blends well into quiches, crock pot stews and soups. Find more uses for frozen kale and how to best preserve this nutrient-packed green.

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Put Your Onions in the Deep Freeze

Too many onions to eat right away? Not a problem. They freeze easily, and can be used in a variety of ways. Learn how to prep onions for safe storage in the deep freeze, how to keep the onion odor low and when to use frozen onions in your dishes.  

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Freeze Asparagus for Great Flavor

While frozen asparagus spears won't be as crisp as garden-fresh stems, they can still be used in many dishes. Here are the steps to preserving this nutrient-dense vegetable and some ideas on how to use frozen asparagus to add flavor to your meals.

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Can You Freeze Garlic Cloves?

You definitely can freeze garlic. In fact, you can freeze garlic in many ways. While frozen garlic lacks the crunchy texture of fresh, the flavor remains strong—and definitely won't have the chemical taste that sometimes accompanies jarred garlic. Learn several ways to freeze garlic and how to use it to add flavor to food.

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How Do You Freeze Eggplant?

Eggplant doesn't keep very long, and you won't be able to can it without pulverizing it beyond recognition. So, how do you preserve your delicious eggplant? Forget your canner and learn how to freeze eggplant. Here are several freezing methods you can try.

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Enjoy a Summertime Favorite All Year

Learn how to freeze corn and you'll be able to enjoy this summertime treat all year—even with your holiday turkey. Freezing corn is simple, and it's a great way to introduce kids to food preservation. Learn the steps to freezing corn in this article by Julie A. Martens.

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How to Freeze Brussels Sprouts

Brussels sprouts bring more than taste to the table. This cabbage cousin boasts vitamins and is high in protein, so you'll want to make your locally-grown Brussels sprouts last. Learn the two ways to freeze Brussels sprouts and ways to include this frozen super veggie on your table.

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Steps to Freezing Cabbage

Want to enjoy the nutrition offered by cabbage all year? This unsung hero of the vegatable garden adapts well to the freezing process. Start with dense, solid heads that feel weighty for their size. Learn more about the steps to freezing cabbage in this article from Julie A. Martens.

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Freeze Celery for Soups

Celery is mostly water, and the freezing process ruptures cell walls, resulting in a limp, mushy product. But frozen celery works fabulously in casseroles, sauces, stock, and other hot concoctions. You can also use it as an aromatic with soups, broths for cooking rice, or roasts, tossing after cooking. Learn the steps to freezing celery in this article.

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Overstocked on Mushrooms?

Mushrooms might last about a week in the refrigerator, which might not be enough time to enjoy the bounty you may have grown or foraged. Consider freezing mushrooms. Learn which method of freezing mushrooms works best, and get some ideas for how to use them in recipes.

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Freezing green onions doesn’t require blanching. Just slice off the roots and leaf tips, wash and dry well, chop, and freeze. It’s really that simple. Most cooks prefer to freeze the tops and bases separately. Think about the way you’ll use the frozen product before making your own decision.

Green onions adapt well to flash freezing. Place the chopped portions on a parchment-lined tray, pop it in the freezer, and when frozen, stash the onions in freezer containers or bags. Chopped green onion tops freeze in as little as 15 minutes this way and thaw even quicker, so work fast to get them into the final container. For easy end-use, place flash-frozen scallions in plastic drink bottles, like water or juice containers, to create a scallion shaker dispenser.

To skip flash freezing, chop green onions and tuck into snack size bags, arranging in a thin layer. To use, break off a piece of the frozen layer. To freeze green onion tops, bundle them together into a “cigar” that fits snugly in the base of a freezer bag. Roll up the bag tightly, securing the ends with rubber bands or binder clips. To use, pull the scallion cigar from the bag and slice off what you need. Re-freeze the remainder.

Some cooks like to freeze green onions in muffin tins or ice cube trays. Covering with water is optional. After the onions freeze solid, pop the chunks into freezer bags. To use these onion cubes, toss as many as you need into your dish. They’ll thaw as they cook.

You can also sautee green onions—bulbs and leaves—in olive oil before freezing. For a more flavorful option, sautée onions, celery, parsley, and garlic, then puree in a food processor. Freeze the mixture in ice cube trays and add to mashed potatoes, rice dishes, and browned ground meat.

No matter how you freeze green onions, be sure to seal them in a container that won’t allow onion odor to escape and flavor your freezer—and everything in it. Double and even triple bag green onions stored in freezer bags. Use raw green onions within a few weeks for best flavor; use cooked ones within a few months.

Next Up

Freezing Onions

Extend your onion harvest by tossing excess bulbs in the freezer. Learn how to prep onions for safe storage in the deep freeze.

Freezing Vegetables

Sun-ripened flavors are one of gardening's simple joys. Learn how to freeze fresh vegetables to enjoy the goodness all year long.

Can You Freeze Celery?

Home-grown celery has a bold flavor that’s tough to beat. Preserve that tangy flavor by freezing celery—we’ll explain how.

Vidalia Onion Soup Recipe: Hail, Hail Vidalia

Cook up a rich vidalia onion soup in celebration of this spring veggie's debut.

Freezing Brussels Sprouts

It’s worth freezing this cabbage cousin when you have homegrown or locally raised versions that boast frost-kissed sweetness.

Freezing Pumpkins

Fill your freezer with healthy portions of everyone’s autumn favorite: the pumpkin. Learn how easy it is to freeze this superfood.

Freezing Asparagus

Preserve the garden-fresh flavor of this spring vegetable by stashing spears in the freezer.

11 Fruits and Veggies You Can Freeze for Later

Whether your garden produced a bountiful harvest or you scored a great deal at the farmer’s market, don’t let any of that good food go to waste.

Freezing Eggplant

Homegrown eggplant is delicious and then some. When you have more than you can eat, learn how to freeze eggplant for later use.

Freezing Cherry Tomatoes

Keep fresh cherry tomato flavor on your meal-time menu well beyond the garden season by preserving excess fruits in the freezer.