Top 10 No-Fail Veggies

Discover easy-growing varieties of your favorite spring and summer veggies with planting and harvesting tips from a Georgia farmer.

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Photo By: Photo Courtesy of Woodland Gardens Organic Farm

©2010, Dorling Kindersley Limited

Photo By: Photo Courtesy of Woodland Gardens Organic Farm

Photo By: Courtesy of Woodland Gardens Organic Farm

Photo By: Photo courtesy of Woodland Gardens Organic Farm

Photo By: Photo courtesy of Woodland Gardens Organic Farm

Photo By: Photo courtesy of Woodland Gardens Organic Farm

Photo By: Image courtesy of Blackberry Farm ©2013, HGTV/Scripps Networks, LLC. All Rights Reserved.

Photo By: Photo courtesy of Woodland Gardens Organic Farm

Photo By: Photo Courtesy of Woodland Gardens Organic Farm

Photo By: Photo Courtesy of Woodland Gardens Organic Farm

Beautiful Bounty

A thoughtful, well-maintained garden in a temperate climate can easily yield carrots, radishes, onions, lettuces and tomatoes and other veggies such as these from Woodland Gardens Organic Farm.

Radishes

Radishes are a great choice for a transition planting. "These make a nice easy crop for early spring," says Celia Barss, farm manager at Woodland Gardens Organic Farm in Georgia. "Thin them to 1 inch to get nice looking radishes."

Carrots

At Woodland Gardens Organic Farm, carrots are harvested in early spring. When growing your own, Barss says, "Loose soil is best. If you have heavy soil, use plenty of mature compost. Be sure to thin to 1 inch."

Spring Onions

Green onions grow in loose soil. "For scallions, plant 8-10 seeds in a clump and grow as a bunch. This makes harvesting easy," says Barss.

Large Onion Varieties

Varieties such as yellow, red and Vidalia sweet onions are springtime favorites in the South. "Onions get their cue to start bulbing from how long the day is," Barss says. "Since length of day depends on where you are on the globe, it's important to grow varieties that are adapted to your area."

Kale

Kale plants come in many varieties, but all love to be be watered and maintained. "Kale likes a fertile, well-drained soil. Consistent moisture will produce the best quality leaves," says Barss. 

Buttery Beauty

Beautiful butter lettuce can be planted at the beginning of the season and will last all summer. "Plant as early as possible, because lettuce is hardy," says Barss. "Sow every 2-3 weeks for a steady supply."

Collard Greens

"Plant these early, because they are best in cool weather," says Barss. "A frost makes them taste better."

Cherry Tomato

At Woodland Gardens Organic Farm, cherry tomatoes grow in rows beside peppers in a spring garden. "Cherry tomatoes are the easiest of the tomatoes to grow," says Barrs. "But be sure to trellis these well—they will yield a lot!"

Vine Time

Tomatoes like the spring and summer sunshine, but timing is important to their productivity. "Don't start tomato plants too early," says Barss. "Root-bound, leggy plants that have open flowers or fruit when planted may remain stunted and produce poorly."

Peppy Peppers

Bell peppers are a spring and summer favorite. "These are heavy feeders," says Barss. "About 8-10 weeks after planting, side dress your plants. Do this by mixing fertilizer into the top inch of soil, 4 inches away from the stem."