20 Beautiful Backsplashes to Inspire Your Own Kitchen

Eye candy abounds!

Nothing changes the look of a kitchen quite like a new backsplash, so it's understandable that actually choosing the perfect option can feel daunting at best. Once you narrow down the color options it's time to start thinking about what materials you want to use, and whether or not you want to incorporate patterns or other bold moves. But in the end, once you debut your kitchen's brand-new look, all the hours spent deciding on a backsplash will be worth it.

To help kickstart your kitchen backsplash search, we've rounded up 20 of our favorite options. There's sure to be something for everyone, whether you love a classic look or something a little more out there.

Blue Chevron

Blue and White Tile Chevron Kitchen Backsplash

Blue and White Tile Chevron Kitchen Backsplash

If you like the idea of a patterned backsplash that won’t go out of style, consider a simple geometric pattern: stripes, diamonds or zigzags, for example. To create this chevron effect, designer Kelli Kaufer used hand-cut stained glass. She bought three different colors, cut them into 1-inch wide by 3-inch long angled pieces, and applied to the wall using a double-sided sticky mat. Then, she grouted with a non-sanded grout. “This backsplash can work with many different styles,” says Kaufer. “Depending on the color of the glass pieces, you can either go bold, creating a hip, modern look, or muted, for a classic, sophisticated style.”

Citrus Yellow

Modern White Kitchen With Neon Yellow Backsplash

Modern White Kitchen With Neon Yellow Backsplash

This modern white kitchen features clean lines and minimalist design. Aeon yellow glass backsplash provides a bright pop of color.

From: HGTV Design Star
and HGTV Design Star

Gray and White

Galley Kitchen Features Contrasting Upper & Lower Cabinets and Bright Red Oven

Galley Kitchen Features Contrasting Upper & Lower Cabinets and Bright Red Oven

Pure Design Interiors gave this kitchen a fresh look with white upper cabinets, brown lower cabinets, solid white countertops and a bright red oven with a stainless steel cooktop. A graphic gray and white backsplash ties the space together and adds visual interest to the design.

From: Pure Design Interiors

Photo by: Pure Design Interiors

Pure Design Interiors

Black and White Lines

Custom Black & White Kitchen Backsplash

Custom Black & White Kitchen Backsplash

The custom black and white backsplash creates an interesting backdrop in this transitional kitchen with all-black cabinetry. A sleek chimney-style range hood is featured between the cabinets.

Photo by: DiFabion Remodeling

DiFabion Remodeling

Geometric Blue and Gold

Modern-Meets-Traditional Kitchen With Oversize Tile Backsplash

Modern-Meets-Traditional Kitchen With Oversize Tile Backsplash

Get kitchen design ideas from this space featured in HGTV Magazine that blends modern and traditional styles. Hand-poured cement tiles from Architectural Ceramics satisfied Jennie’s desire for craftsmanship and color. Matt, hesitant at first about having huge yellow and blue diamonds spanning the entire wall, now loves how the tiles make the kitchen feel energetic and lively.

Photo by: Trevor Dixon (styled by Karin Olsen)

Trevor Dixon (styled by Karin Olsen)

Earthy Stones

River Rock Kitchen Backsplash

River Rock Kitchen Backsplash

River rock pebbles create a unique backsplash in this kitchen.

Photo by: Photography by Carl Socolow

Photography by Carl Socolow

Vibrant Green

Modern Kitchen With Green Tile Backsplash

Modern Kitchen With Green Tile Backsplash

For a homeowner who loves the color green, apple green glass subway tiles make up the kitchen backsplash. Walnut cabinets and Caesarstone countertops help pull the space together.

Photo by: KuDa Photography - Darius Kuzmickas

KuDa Photography - Darius Kuzmickas

Wood Panels

Wood Backsplash in Modern Kitchen

Wood Backsplash in Modern Kitchen

For the kitchen of a vacation house in Portland, Ore., designer Michelle Ruber of Encircle Design and Build wanted a stylish and low-maintenance material that would stand up to a high-traffic environment. She found her solution in an unlikely place: “The backsplash is the old pony wall in the basement that was removed during the remodel,” she says. “We had the wood planed and then applied it to the backsplash, which brought in a warm feel and history of the original structure. We used a durable marine-grade varnish to protect and properly seal the wood.”

Photo by: Kurt Hettle; Design By: Michelle Ruber, Encircle Design and Build

Colorful Grout



Photo by: Alison Gootee/STUDIO D - HEARST

Alison Gootee/STUDIO D - HEARST

Moody Texture

Small Contemporary Kitchen With Textured Backsplash

Small Contemporary Kitchen With Textured Backsplash

This quilted tile backsplash is the focus of this small neutral kitchen. The kitchen, which also serves as a dining room, is limited to using one wall of the room, so this metallic backsplash made it easy to add embellishment and distract from the small size of the contemporary space.

Photo by: Gail Fedela

Gail Fedela

Sleek Marble

Neutral Modern Kitchen With Marble Backsplash

Neutral Modern Kitchen With Marble Backsplash

A beautiful slab of white marble serves as a stunning backsplash in this simple kitchen. Storage cabinets are finished to match the stainless steel appliances.

Photo by: David Lauer

David Lauer

White Subway Tiles With Black Grout

White Kitchen Cabinets and Backsplash

White Kitchen Cabinets and Backsplash

Refinishing these kitchen cabinets and painting them white helped to lighten and brighten the space. As is seen throughout the home, the white elements are offset by dark ones, here in the countertops and appliances.

Photo by: Chipper Hatter Photography

Chipper Hatter Photography

Bold Blue

Blue Mosaic Tile Kitchen Backsplash and Sink

Blue Mosaic Tile Kitchen Backsplash and Sink

Blues from light to dark echo the ocean and are a pretty complement to this beach house's location. Pair the backsplash with a few ocean friends and you can almost hear the waves crash.

Photo by: B-Rad Photography

B-Rad Photography

Black With White Grout

Midcentury Stools

Midcentury Stools

Midcentury-style 30-inch stools with faux black leather seats, low back rests and lipped edges provide comfy seating at the kitchen's center island.

Photo by: Robert Peterson, Rustic White Photography

Robert Peterson, Rustic White Photography


Transitional Kitchen With Turquoise Tile Backsplash

Transitional Kitchen With Turquoise Tile Backsplash

The cheery yellow walls in this transitional kitchen are perfectly complemented by a bright turquoise backsplash. Crisp white cabinets add to the kitchen's happy vibe, while a turquoise dining chair complements the backsplash.

Simple Cubes

Diamond Backsplash

Diamond Backsplash

"Recessed high hats are a go-to for us. They do the hard work of lighting up the kitchen but still create a warm look. We put decorative lighting over either an island or the sink. Black grout accentuates the pattern of a backsplash—in this case, a diamond pattern—and it never looks dirty, like white grout can," say John and Anthony. Get the look: Little Diamonds ceramic tile, $24 per square foot, heathceramics.com

Photo by: Ann Summa/Getty Images for HGTV

Ann Summa/Getty Images for HGTV

Metallic Marble

Shimmery Marble Backsplash in Transitional Kitchen

Shimmery Marble Backsplash in Transitional Kitchen

A shimmery marble backsplash in copper tones shines against the crisp white cabinets and black countertops in this kitchen. To give it that extra wow factor, under cabinet lights highlight the backsplash.

Photo by: Orren Pickell Building Group

Orren Pickell Building Group

Eye-Catching Pattern

Neutral Kitchen With Black Backsplash

Neutral Kitchen With Black Backsplash

The design goal of this sophisticated kitchen? Infuse its Cape Cod architecture with midcentury modern style. The kitchen cabinetry took a year of searching for the perfect wood. The winner: a European Compressed Oak.

Photo by: Laure Joliet

Laure Joliet

Soothing Turquoise

Blue Transitional Kitchen With Blue Subway Tile Backsplash

Blue Transitional Kitchen With Blue Subway Tile Backsplash

Robin's egg blue glazed subway tiles add high gloss pop to this kitchen's backsplash. High-end amenities abound including a cook top, pot filler faucet, and chef-grade appliances.

Photo by: Tobi Fairley

Tobi Fairley

Navy and White and Rustic

Distinct Patterned Backsplash in Contemporary Kitchen

Distinct Patterned Backsplash in Contemporary Kitchen

The distinctively patterned backsplash is a defining feature in the kitchen and, since they are all handmade, the pattern on each individual tile is subtly unique.

From: Fixer Upper

Photo by: Rachel Whyte

Rachel Whyte

45 Splashy Kitchen Backsplashes

See All Photos

So Many Options

From traditional tile to trendy glass — and shiny metal to rustic wood — there is seemingly no end of choices for kitchen backsplashes today. "Tile is still the most popular backsplash material, with natural stone a fast-growing second," says John Morgan, 2013 National President of the National Kitchen and Bath Association. "But with the right installer, you can make just about any material work."

Salvaged Materials: Antique Wood Mosaic

A foil to shimmering stainless steel, this mosaic tile backsplash from the HGTV Dream Home 2014 kitchen is fashioned from antique boat wood. Impervious to moisture, it requires neither grout nor sealant.

Salvaged Materials: Reclaimed Wood

Who says hardwood is only meant for floors? The standout feature of this open-concept kitchen is the reclaimed wood backsplash that warms up the stainless steel appliances and concrete floor.

Paper: Marble + Wallpaper

A white kitchen doesn't have to be ALL white. Here, a gleaming white Carrara marble backsplash gives way to make the fanciful floral wallpaper the star. 

Photo By: Andrea Schumacher

Paper: Picture Perfect

Break from tradition with a custom kitchen backsplash that doubles as a photo wall. Designer Brian Patrick Flynn gave a sentimental twist to this sleek, modern kitchen with a cutting-edge backsplash printed from a favorite family photo. Orange accents brighten the monochromatic palette.

From: Brian Patrick Flynn

Reflective Finish: Mirror, Mirror on the Wall

This mirrored backsplash might be the fairest of them all. A small kitchen space immediately feels larger with this mirrored surface and bright white marble countertops.

Photo By: Chris Amaral © 2013, HGTV/Scripps Networks, LLC. All Rights Reserved.

Reflective Finish: Antique Mirror

The antiqued mirror backsplash in this 19th Century Japanese kitchen has just enough reflective qualities to brighten the small space without being too distracting. The mirror's vintage finish pairs well with custom wood cabinetry.

Budget Friendly: Coffee Beans

Featured in Blog Cabin 2014, a coffee and tea bar became the inspiration for this cozy coffeehouse design. Cast in epoxy, this coffee bean backsplash creates an eye-catching focal point and gives texture to the wall.

Photo By: Eric Perry ©2014, DIY Network/Scripps Networks, LLC. All Rights Reserved.

Budget Friendly: Tin Sheets

Once a traditional ceiling adornment, tin is now making its way into the kitchen backsplash arena. The tin backsplash in this white kitchen is a budget-friendly fix that also adds visual interest. White cabinets and countertops keep the small space feeling light and open.

From: Jill Wolff

Bold Blue

Any chef would feel right at home in this colorful cottage kitchen with its bold and energetic backsplash. The custom blue cabinets in this kitchen form the perfect background for the unique green, blue and white tile.

Photo By: Jean-Marc Giboux/Getty Images

Soaring Subway

Want to make a statement with a classic white subway tile? Take it all the way up to the ceiling for a super clean finish like this kitchen from the HGTV Urban Oasis 2015. 

Embossed Concrete

Intricate but hardworking, an embossed concrete tile backsplash in an interlocking hexagonal pattern creates a sense of formality in the kitchen when paired with traditional cabinetry. 

Textured Tile

This neutral kitchen is anything but vanilla where a sculptural limestone backsplash adds texture and depth to a space filled with smooth light wood cabinets and white quartz countertops.

Photo By: Antonio Martins

Metallics: Stainless Steel

Virtually every color plays well with this metallic kitchen backsplash. The stainless steel tile provides a modern contrast against multi-hued Fiestaware and dark red kitchen cabinets.

From: Kim Alexandriuk

Photo By: Photo Credit: Edward Addeo

Metallics: 3-D Finished Bronze

This hip geometric design is a perfect complement for a contemporary kitchen. The white bronze tiles are finished with a light patina and extend out into the space for visual interest.

Metallics: Penny Tile

This contemporary kitchen takes a sophisticated approach to a penny-tile backsplash. Round metallic tiles pop against black walls, black door, cabinets and shiny black countertop. The hanging lights echo the backsplash's geometric design.

Metallics: Copper Tile

Ceramic tiles covered in a thin coating of copper comprise this backsplash by Tami Holsten of Bear Trap Design. Although there is a protective coating on top, says Holsten, "Copper is a living material, so it will naturally patina over time. In my opinion, that just makes it more beautiful." When cleaning copper, she recommends using a pH-balanced cleanser as anything acidic will damage the finish.

Photo By: Photography by Tami Holsten

Chalkboard Paint

If you think all work and no play can make a backsplash dull, there are plenty of ways to bring a light touch into a hardworking kitchen. Here, a backsplash painted with chalkboard paint allows homeowners to keep a recipe handy, write family reminders, or just doodle. The best part? When they want to change the message — or clean things up — they just wipe the chalkboard clean.

Ceramic + Glass Tile

Can't decide between ceramic and glass? This 'Island Star Mosaic' from Porcelanosa's Victorian Collection is a combination of matte porcelain and iridescent glass, which creates subtle changes when it reflects light. Design by Nancy Blandford.

Ceramic + Glass Tile

"The kitchen is a warm, transitional style," says designer Nancy Blandford, CMKBD, ASID, "with an eclectic mix of traditional materials. The blacksplash serves as the perfect way to tie together distinct elements, including glass doors, an unusually-shaped island top and the range hood."

Photo By: Photography by Nancy Blandford

Limestone + Glass Tile

In this kitchen, the mix of materials was created not by a tile manufacturer, but by the designer. Brigitte Fabri, CMKBD, of Drury Designs, wanted to create a "castle wall" effect in this kitchen, without detracting from the room's focal point — the copper hood. For most of the backsplash, she chose a large scale 12x24 'Crema Marfil' limestone because the larger the tile, the fewer distracting grout lines, she explains. And behind the range, she used a honed glass tile called 'Malaga Cove Wings' by Stone & Pewter. To add the illusion of greater height to the 8-foot ceilings, Fabri brought the tile down as close to the range as she could and elongated the niche area all the way up to the hood itself.

Tumbled Stone + Glass Tile

Another gorgeous mixed-media backsplash: Here, glass is mixed with today's popular natural stone. To ensure that this kitchen by Remodelworks looked distinctive, the client installed glass tile behind the range to accent the 4x4 tumbled stone tile that makes up most of the backsplash. Then, interior designer Dixie Lovejoy came up with the idea of turning the tile vertically, so that it looks like a waterfall or rising steam.

Stone: River Rock

Although the most common use of these river rock pebbles is actually shower floors, photo stylist Chris Walker and her husband came up with the idea of using them as a kitchen backsplash. They asked their kitchen designer John Petrie, CMKBD, president elect of the National Kitchen and Bath Association, to install it on the walls. "The one-of-a-kind, free-flowing edges of the pebbles not only mimic the flow of soft teal veins in the dark green soapstone countertops," says Walker, "but also balance the vertical lines of the Shaker-style cabinet doors." Lesson learned: when you're shopping for backsplash materials, ask the vendor to show you floor tiles, as well. While not every product will adapt well to vertical application, you may hit upon an unusual — and easily implemented — idea.

Stone: Quartzite Sandstone

This textured, rustic backsplash makes it look as if this kitchen by Hamilton-Gray Design is fully constructed of stone. But, in fact, the quartzite material actually comes in pieces that are applied just like tile, making it a viable choice even in a home with plaster or sheetrock walls.

Stone: Translucent Agate

Rustic not quite your style? Stone can be sleek and dramatic, as well. This backsplash by Eurotech Cabinetry Inc. features backlit 'Concetto' — a translucent product fabricated of natural agate. The remainder of the backsplash is 'Blue Lagos' Caesarstone. Hanging storage rails suspended from it to the right and left of the stove provide handy access to cooking tools.

Photo By: Photography by Eurotech Cabinetry, Inc

Stone: Marble Mosaic

Like glass, stone can be cut and carved into various shapes for backsplash tile. The tile Jamie Florence Designs used here looks like a mosaic but comes in easily installed 12 x 12 sheets.

Photo By: Photography by Eric Roth

Stone: Marble Mosaic

The imperfections and color variation of the stone create interest — offering the same natural uniqueness of marble slabs with the added appeal of a geometric design. Design by Jamie Florence.

Stone: Marble Checkerboard

If you don't find marble tiles in the exact sizes and shapes you want for a backsplash, marble can be custom cut. To bring in some of the lush green landscape beyond the large windows of this home, designer Eileen Kollias, CKD, cut green and white 12-inch marble tiles into 6x6 squares with chamfered edges. The tiles are laid in a harlequin pattern than brings a bit of whimsy into this elegant home, and serves as a dramatic backdrop for prized pieces such as the homeowner's antique coffee grinder/coffee storage cabinet.

Stone: Honed Marble

Tami Holsten of Bear Trap Design chose the 'Toros' black marble that surrounds this kitchen for its dramatic contrast with the soft white cabinets. "The white veining — which is what distinguishes marble from granite — instinctively draws people in for a closer look, and provides the rustic character I was looking for in this kitchen," says Holsten. Two-inch-square cast-metal tiles add a warm, rich feel.

Photo By: Photography by Tami Holsten

Stone: Honed Marble

Designer Tami Holsten laid the tiles in a classic brickwork pattern and ran the backsplash high up on the wall, providing a large backdrop for the dramatic stove hood made partially from a large oak tree from the property.

Pattern: Brickwork

Familiar as it is, a brickwork tile scheme can look fresh — if the tile itself is eye-catching. The kitchen pros at Drury Designs chose this brown subway tile to add contrast to an all white kitchen — and to make the space appear larger, because the glass tile reflects light. Running the tile all the way up the wall also adds dimension to the space by drawing the eye upwards.

From: Drury Design

Pattern: Herringbone

While the array of unique — and expensive — tile available today is vast and appealing, you don't need to spend a lot of money to achieve dramatic results. Kitchen designer Jodie Gould, AKBD, used basic subway tile for the backsplash in her own kitchen, but laid it in an eye-catching herringbone pattern, and designed an unusual shape for the edge. "We thought it might look weird to just have the tile end on a straight line since there's so much on that wall," says Gould, "So we drew a curve on some MDF and put some molding together on site. It was actually very easy and very inexpensive."

Pattern: Stacked Columns

But of course, there's more than one way to lay out rectangular tiles. Rather than stagger these glass tiles brickwork-style, designer Nathalie Tremblay of Atelier Cachet chose to stack them in neat columns. The long, low dimensions of 2x10 white glass rectangles — and the fact that they run only partway up the wall — lend additional horizontal focus to the kitchen's sleek, low profile design.

Unusual Materials: Volcanic Rock

In addition to reflecting light, glass backsplashes can actually bring sunshine into a kitchen. The vistas beyond this kitchen were nothing to write home about, so designers at Carnemark installed detail-obscuring glass blocks on either side of the stove's backsplash, which is made of volcanic rock by SieMatic. Quarried in Italy, this stone is similar to that used by the ancient Romans to build roads, and has been used for various surface applications from building cladding to tile to countertops for centuries.

Photo By: Photography by Anice Hoachlander

Unusual Materials: Industrial Steel

If the thought of using familiar materials in a new way appeals to you, consider industrial steel. As part of the contemporary/industrial look designer Tom Lutz, AKBD, was asked to create for a client's kitchen, he installed a backsplash of 20-gauge stainless steel — the same material used in restaurants and hospitals. Using the steel as a backsplash rather than a horizontal counter surface, Lutz notes, makes it less likely to become scratched (although the material will still develop some wear and tear over time, especially if ceramic-bottom pots repeatedly rub against it.) To keep the steel from separating from the wall behind it or damaging the adjacent cabinets, Lutz cut the metal larger than needed and tucked the margins behind them.

Unusual Materials: Indigenous Wood

Like steel, wood is a familiar material than can be made to look entirely fresh in a backsplash application. The sugar maple wood of this backsplash by Susan Fredman was harvested right on the property of this beach house in Michigan. "I really prefer to use only wood that can be grown where it resides," Fredman says.

Unusual Materials: Repurposed Plywood

If you don't want to harvest new wood for your backsplash project, you can take your cue from Karen Swanson of New England Design Works, who had her contractor rip sheets of found plywood into 6-inch-wide planks, and install them 3/8" apart on the walls of this kitchen. This resourceful backsplash — a modern interpretation of shiplap paneling, Swanson explains — is painted with Benjamin Moore Satin Impervo paint, which makes it stand up well in a kitchen. "Painted plywood is not as 'bullet proof' as some other backsplash choices one could make," Swanson concedes. "I would suggest wiping up spills quickly and not allowing standing water next to this — but then again, I also suggest that with a tile and grouted backsplash."

Unusual Materials: Recycled Glass

Another great example of design that reduces, reuses and recycyles: The backsplash and counters in this Bay Area kitchen by Massucco Warner Miller are Icestone terrazzo, made locally in Berkeley, CA, of concrete with flecks of recycled bottles and glass. In addition to being eco-friendly, Icestone is extremely durable — a great material, MWM's Julie Massucco notes, for houses where there are avid cooks, small children and messes in general. Because of its sea glass colors, this terazzo would be especially lovely in a beach house.

Unusual Materials: Modular Panels

Beach house kitchens needn't be blue and green, of course. Heather Pond, CMKBD, chose this paintable 'Dune' backsplash by Modular Arts for her own family's cottage on Cape Cod — and decided to keep the panels white. In addition to referencing the seashore vibe of the surroundings, the white backsplash creates dramatic shadows at night, when the cabinet lights shine upon their textured surface.

Colorful Glass Tile

The glass in this blacksplash was chosen to complement art-glass pieces in the homeowners' collection. To achieve the look, large sheets of glass were cut into tiles and laid individually. "The challenge in working with glass is getting the best colors and control," says Risë Krag, LEED, AP, who designed this kitchen. "There is a natural flow of pattern that is not consistent in color. And the variances are beautiful but need to be implemented skillfully."

From: Rise Krag

Glass Tile Mosaic

Kitchen designer Alison Solar took her inspiration for this glass-tile mosaic from Art Nouveau artist Alphonse Mucha's 1895 poster of fruit. Working closely with a local mosaic tile artisan, Solar had the backsplash, which wraps around much of the 250-square-foot kitchen, fabricated of tiles cut entirely by hand from 14x14 sheets of glass. A slightly darker grout than the colors usually used with glass helps enhance the design by making the details pop.

Etched Glass Tile

Another one-of-a-kind glass installation, this custom backsplash in a kitchen by Glenda Anderson and Susan Haas, CKD, CBD, of Details International, reflects the clients' love of their Hawaii home. The kiln-fired glass, created in the Honolulu workshop of a local glass artist, was both etched and carved from the back, leaving a smooth front surface for easy cleaning. LED lighting highlights the texture and carvings in the glass.

Handmade Tile

One-of-a-kind backsplash mosaics can be made of ceramic tile as well. Mosaic artist Vicki Morrow of Tile Art Mosaics in Scottsdale, Arizona, designed and fabricated this backsplash for clients who collect southwestern art.

Photo By: Photography by Vicki Morrow

Handmade Tile

Made of ceramic tile that Morrow custom designs, cuts and glazes for each of her backsplash installation projects, this design was inspired by the pottery of the Mimbres Indians of southern New Mexico.

Photo By: Photography by Vicki Morrow

3-D Custom Glass Tile

"The backsplash is the blank canvas of the kitchen," says John Ryba, who designed this unique aquarium-inspired backsplash with three-dimensional glass fish and bubbles. "It's an opportunity to add color, function and harmony to the overall design."

Photo By: Photography by John Ryba

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