How to Plant a Wall-Mounted Pocket Garden

Follow these steps to create a lush living wall in a matter of minutes.

Photo By: Photo by Heidi Geldhauser/design by Linsday Coletta

Photo By: Photo by Heidi Geldhauser/design by Linsday Coletta

Photo By: Photo by Heidi Geldhauser/design by Linsday Coletta

Photo By: Photo by Heidi Geldhauser/design by Linsday Coletta

Photo By: Photo by Heidi Geldhauser/design by Linsday Coletta

Photo By: Photo by Heidi Geldhauser/design by Linsday Coletta

Photo By: Photo by Heidi Geldhauser/design by Linsday Coletta

Photo By: Photo by Heidi Geldhauser/design by Linsday Coletta

Photo By: Photo by Heidi Geldhauser/design by Linsday Coletta

Create a Beautiful Vertical Garden

These little fabric wall planters make a big statement. Because they are so easy to care for, they also make a perfect no-fuss gift.

Gather Your Supplies

You will need: a woolly pocket (or another type of fabric wall planter) / potting soil / plants—we're using shade-tolerant assortment of pansies, heuchera, peach torenia and variegated creeping fig. If you are interested in exploring other plant options for color or texture visit your local nursery. Flowers like pansies always come in an array of beautiful colors.

What's a Woolly Pocket?

Woolly pockets are space-saving wall planters made from fabric. They come in a variety of sizes and can even be used indoors. The pockets are designed with a water-retaining reservoir.

Start Planting

Begin by planning the variegated creeping fig. Place your plant right into the pocket. I began planting on the right side working my way to the other side.

Plant the Pansies

Next, plant your pansies inside your woolly pocket.

Don't Overcrowd!

Make sure your plants are secure but not too tight. You want them to have room to grow and thrive.

Plant the Heuchera

Then continue by planting your heuchera.

Plant the Torenia

Finish with planting your torenia plant.

Watering Tip

Make sure to water your pocket weekly—you may need to water more or less pending rainfall. If the top inch or two of the soil is dry, it's time to water. Use a watering can with a long, narrow spout, or even an old wine or champagne bottle, for easy watering.