13 Trees You Can’t Kill

Invest in trees that withstand tough conditions.
Similar Topics:

Photo By: Image courtesy of Bailey Nurseries, Inc.

Photo By: Image courtesy of Bailey Nurseries, Inc.

Photo By: Image courtesy of Bailey Nurseries, Inc.

Photo By: Image courtesy of Bailey Nurseries, Inc.

Photo By: Image courtesy of Bailey Nurseries, Inc.

Photo By: Image courtesy of Bailey Nurseries, Inc.

Photo By: Image courtesy of Bailey Nurseries, Inc.

Photo By: Image courtesy of Bailey Nurseries, Inc.

Crusader Hawthorn (Crataegus crus-galli ‘Cruzam’)

For an eye-catching small tree, consider thornless Crusader hawthorn. It produces white flowers in spring followed by orange berries that burnish red with fall frosts. Berries linger into winter, beckoning birds. Fall color is showy, with shades of red, orange and gold. Grows to 15 feet tall and wide. Hardy in Zones 4 to 7.

Rejoice™ Crabapple (Malus ‘Rejzam’)

This crabapple boasts pretty-in-pink spring blooms with very little fruit set following. The tree has a strongly upright form that doesn’t require pruning to maintain shape. Use this drought tolerant tree as a specimen or planted as part of a mixed border. Grows 15 to 20 feet tall and wide. Hardy in Zones 4 to 7.

First Editions Snowdance Japanese Tree Lilac (Syringa reticulata ‘Bailnce’)

Savor the beauty of lilacs in a tree form. Fragrant white blooms blanket this lilac in early summer, fading without producing ugly seed pods. The tree shape has a strong round canopy that’s wider than tall. It creates great shade and is a good street tree or specimen in a yard. Grows 18 feet tall by 20 feet wide. Hardy in Zones 3 to 7.

Black Tupelo (Nyssa sylvatica)

A showy native tree, black tupelo has a broadly pyramidal shape that provides cooling shade. Fall color is reliably striking and features shades of red, purple, yellow and orange. Use as a street tree, in a naturalized wildlife garden or as a shade tree. Hardy in Zones 4 to 9.

Northern Catalpa (Catalpa speciosa)

This tall tree puts on a spectacular flower show in early summer. Blossoms fade to form long cigar-like pods, giving rise to the common name of cigar tree. Catalpa tolerates urban growing conditions easily and makes a good avenue tree. Plant as a shade tree but away from swimming pools to avoid excessive plant litter in the water. Grows to 60 feet tall by 40 feet wide. Hardy in Zones 4 to 8.

Littleleaf Linden (Tilia cordata)

Choose littleleaf linden for an excellent shade tree with an eye-catching form. Fragrant flowers with striking lime-green bracts cover the tree in early to midsummer. Linden blooms beckon bees like crazy. Grows to 60 feet tall by 40 feet wide. Hardy in Zones 3 to 7; can survive in Zone 8 with afternoon shade.

Allegheny Serviceberry (Amelanchier laevis)

A hearty native tree, serviceberry forms a multi-stemmed clump if left unpruned. Alternately, prune to one main stem for an eye-catching small tree. White flowers appear in early spring followed by fruits that ripen from pink to deep purple. Fall color is spectacular with orange, gold and red. Grows 15 to 30 feet tall by 10 to 15 feet wide. Hardy in Zones 4 to 8.

Common Hackberry (Celtis occidentalis)

This tall native tree is an elm cousin and has a similar form—elegant and spreading. It’s a good choice for a shade tree in a yard. Hard berry-like fruit ripens in late summer and lures in flocks of migrating birds. Hackberry grows 40 to 60 feet tall by 40 to 50 feet wide. Hardy in Zones 2 to 9.

Three Flowered Maple (Acer triflorum)

This small maple fits neatly into average suburban yards and is a good replacement for the popular but invasive amur maple. Plant as a specimen tree or in small groupings. Fall color typically features a blend of orange-red and gold. Grows 20 to 30 feet tall and wide. Hardy in Zones 4 to 7.

Seven-Son Flower (Heptacodium miconioides)

White flowers blanket this small tree (to 20 feet tall) in late summer and early fall. Pink flower bases linger for weeks after. Landscape use: Good choice for drought-tolerant landscape or seaside plantings. Use in wildlife gardens. Hardy in Zones 5 to 8.

American Hornbeam (Carpinus caroliniana)

Known by a host of common names, including musclewood, ironwood and blue beech, this native tree brings strong beauty to the landscape. Thin, slate-gray bark has a muscled appearance and looks striking in wintry scenes. Hornbeam is a low-maintenance tree that thrives in the shade of other trees. Fall color includes yellow, red and orange. Grows 15 to 20 feet tall by up to 40 feet across. Hardy in Zones 3 to 9.

Buttonwood (Conocarpus erectus var. sericeus)

Meet an evergreen tree that lends a showy presence to a yard. Flowers are easily overlooked, but produce showy red-brown fruits that beckon birds. This silvery beauty tolerates urban conditions and makes a great street-side tree, or plant several to create a hedge. It also survives well in containers. Grows to 50 feet tall by 20 feet wide. Hardy in Zones 9B to 10.

Bur Oak (Quercus macrocarpa)

This sturdy native oak is usually one of the tallest, reaching heights of 80 feet. Acorn caps feature a woody fringe along the edges, explaining the common name of bur or mossy cup oak. Acorns are large, growing to 2 inches long. It’s probably too big for most yards, but works as a great shade tree. Gnarled branch formation is striking in a wintry landscape. Grows 70 to 80 feet tall and wide. In open settings, width can become equal to height. Hardy in Zones 2 to 9.