How to Grow Pineapple Plants

Learn how to grow a pineapple plant in your yard or in a pot.

Tropical Pineapple Plants Bear Striking Fruits

Tropical Pineapple Plants Bear Striking Fruits

Growing a pineapple is easy but takes patience. It can easily be started from a cutting and grow in a container. However, a pineapple plant can take up to 3 years before it bears fruit.

©2011, Dorling Kindersley Limited

2011, Dorling Kindersley Limited

Growing a pineapple is easy but takes patience. It can easily be started from a cutting and grow in a container. However, a pineapple plant can take up to 3 years before it bears fruit.

If you want to grow your own pineapples, there are three ways to get started. The first is to purchase a pineapple plant and grow it until it produces fruit. Second, you could try starting the plants from seed. The third and surest way to produce your own pineapple is to start it from the green top of a fresh pineapple.

Buying a Pineapple Plant 

Pineapple plants may be available in your local garden center or there are also sources online. When growing pineapples, remember that their roots do not like to stay wet. In fact they like similar soil conditions as cacti: well drained and on the dry side, but with an acidic pH of 4.5-6.5. To determine when to water, the soil should be dry and you should check inside the junctions where the leaves meet the plant; if there is water in those little pockets then skip watering, if not then water over the top of the plant. Fertilize monthly with a balanced liquid fertilizer (5-5-5, 10-10-10, etc.) mixed according to the manufacturer’s directions, and showered over the plant just like a normal watering.

Starting Pineapples From Seed 

To start a pineapple from seed, you will first have to obtain the seed. Occasionally there will be seeds in a store-bought pineapple. Buy a yellow-ripe fruit. As you cut the fruit, look for the small black seeds about three-eighths of an inch in from the outside edge. Rinse the seeds. Germinate the seeds by lightly wrapping them in a wet paper towel and placing it in a plastic zipper bag. Keep the bag in a constantly warm (65-75 degrees) place. It takes about six months for the seeds to sprout, at which time the baby plants can be carefully planted in temporary growing containers (1-2 quart size) where they can be babied until they are large enough to plant in the garden or a permanent larger pot.

Starting Pineapple From a Cutting 

Starting a pineapple from a green top is possibly the cheapest and easiest way to begin. Buy a well ripened fruit with the healthiest looking top you can find. Some rough leaves are okay, but try to find the best one of the lot. Simply remove the top by grasping the fruit in one hand and the top in the other and twisting it off in one steady motion (like wringing out a towel). Remove the lower half dozen leaves or so from the bottom of the green shoot, then set it aside and allow it to “cure,” or dry out, for about a week. Plant the cured pineapple top in a 8 or 10” pot filled with a coarse potting mix, and fertilize it with a balanced liquid fertilizer (shower the liquid right over the top).

How to Grow a Pineapple Plant Outdoors 

Pineapple plants require a bit of space. If grown in the ground, allow five feet between plants. In containers, whether inside or out, three to five feet will be good. They also grow best in lots of sun (at least 6 hours). For indoor growers, consider moving the pots outside until freezing temperatures threaten, then moving indoors to the brightest spot in the house (south facing window is best). Pineapples can reliably be grown outdoors in USDA hardiness zones 11-12. 

Regardless of how it was started, a pineapple plant matures at between two and three years of age when it will bear its first fruit. Afterward, it can fruit another time or two at roughly two year intervals before the plant “wears out.” However, a pineapple in its productive years may “sucker,” providing yet more opportunities to start new plants. Suckers are baby plants that can form below the soil, between the leaves or along the flower stalk either below or from the side of the fruit. Any of these suckers may be removed from the parent plant to start new pineapples.

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