Make a Fall Leaf Wreath

Learn how to transform those colorful fallen leaves into a beautiful wreath.

Photo By: Photo by Melissa Caughey

Photo By: Photo by Melissa Caughey

Photo By: Photo by Melissa Caughey

Photo By: Photo by Melissa Caughey

Photo By: Photo by Melissa Caughey

Photo By: Photo by Melissa Caughey

Photo By: Photo by Melissa Caughey

Photo By: Photo by Melissa Caughey

Photo By: Photo by Melissa Caughey

Photo By: Photo by Melissa Caughey

Photo By: Photo by Melissa Caughey

Photo By: Photo by Melissa Caughey

Photo By: Photo by Melissa Caughey

Photo By: Photo by Melissa Caughey

Photo By: Photo by Melissa Caughey

How to Make a Colorful Fall Wreath

Learn how to turn those fallen leaves into a glorious wreath celebrating the arrival of Autumn.

Gather Your Supplies

To make this wreath, you will need: freshly fallen leaves / needle / quilting thread / wire wreath frame / scissors / garden twine

Choose a Variety of Colors

The more diverse the colors of the leaves, the more interesting your wreath will be.

Thread the Needle

Thread the needle with a length of thread at least four feet long. Knot the end with a loop.

String a Leaf

Push the needle through the back of the first leaf and pull it gently until the looped knot is flush with the leaf's back.

Keep on Stringing

Continue to thread the leaves one by one onto the needle with all the backs facing in the same direction.

Garland of Leaves

Continue stringing the leaves as long as you desire. If you stop at this point, you can tie garden twine to each ends and make a mantle decoration. To make the wreath continue on.

A Little Support

As you thread the leaves, they do get heavy. Use the support of a chair to help rest the strung leaves. Continue stringing the leaves until they make a circle that fits the wire wreath frame.

Tie it Off

Tie the end string around the beginning loop. Pull together until the string is hidden and tie it in a knot.

Rotate the Stems

Gently turn the leaves with the stems facing in until the stems are on the outside of the wreath.

Taking Shape

Once the stems are no longer in the center, it's time to tie it to the wire frame to help maintain the circular shape and give it support.

Flip it Over

Turn the wreath over. Gently place the wire frame on the back. Cut a piece of garden twine about 4 inches long. Sliding the twine between the leaves, tie the wreath onto the form. Repeat this step in five other spots on the wreath.

Gorgeous Color

The wreath is full of fall colors. Cut another longer piece of twine to hang the wreath on a door.

Drying Up

The wreath will dry on the form. Enjoy it inside or out but protect it from the elements to extend your enjoyment.

Colors of Fall

The wreath really pops on this cheerfully painted door.

Next Up

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