8 Types of Windows

From bay windows to casements, learn about your options before purchasing.
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Photo By: Photo by Steve Henke (buyout)

Photo By: Daniel Levin

What Are Your Needs?

There are many different types of windows that make up the construction of your house. Windows allow natural light to flood your rooms during the day and let in air to keep it fresh and dry. Your windows also help define the style of your house whether it is traditional or modern. You can customize nearly any window to suit your changing tastes and needs. Photo courtesy of Anderson Windows and Doors

Double-Hung Windows

This type of window has two sashes that slide vertically up and down in the frame. They can open wide from either the top or the bottom, but they remain inside the frame so they don't protrude out to the exterior or interior of the house. On a single-hung window, only the bottom part of the window operates while the top part remains stationary. Photo courtesy of Marvin Windows and Doors

Casement Windows

These hinged windows operate by a turn of a crank in an operating mechanism. They can be hinged on the left or the right to open outward. Photo courtesy of Marvin Windows

Awning Windows

Hinged at the top, awning windows open outward to let in air from the left or right and the bottom. They can be installed above, below or alongside a stationary or operating window. Photo courtesy of Marvin Windows

Picture Window

This variety is a large stationary window that lets in the maximum amount of light and views of the outdoors. Photo courtesy of SPG Architects.

Transom Window

A narrow window that can be either operating to let in air or non-operating (stationary) and mounted above a door or window to let in more light. Photo courtesy of Marvin Windows

Slider Windows

Gliding along a track, sliding windows have at least one operating window that slides horizontally over or past the other window. They are most often used in modern- or contemporary-style houses. Photo courtesy of Jeld Wen Windows and Doors

Stationary Windows

These windows do not open, but they can be customized in nearly any angle or shape you desire. They are often found in modern- or contemporary-style houses in conjunction with operating windows. Photo courtesy of Marvin Windows

Bay or Bow Windows

Generally, bay or bow windows give you more interior space, as they protrude out from the exterior of the siding of the house. They are a combination of windows often with a stationary window in the middle flanked by either double-hung windows or casements. Photo courtesy of Tracy Morris.

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