Tour an Artist's Eclectic Garden

Step inside artist Steven Stinchcomb's Southern garden at Turnipseed Farms in Fayetteville, Georgia. 

Photo By: Photo by Laura James

Photo By: Photo by Laura James

Photo By: Photo by Laura James

Photo By: Photo by Laura James

Photo By: Photo by Laura James

Photo By: Photo by Laura James

Photo By: Photo by Laura James

Photo By: Photo by Laura James

Photo By: Photo by Laura James

Photo By: Photo by Laura James

Photo By: Photo by Laura James

Photo By: Photo by Laura James

Photo By: Photo by Laura James

Photo By: Photo by Laura James

Photo By: Photo by Laura James

Photo By: Photo by Laura James

Photo By: Photo by Laura James

Photo By: Photo by Laura James

Photo By: Photo by Laura James

Photo By: Photo by Laura James

Photo By: Photo by Laura James

Photo By: Photo by Laura James

Photo By: Photo by Laura James

An Artist's Garden

With the many sculptures, paintings, wooden signs, birdhouses, handcrafted furniture and arbors—many made from repurposed materials—it's no surprise the owner of Turnipseed Farms is an artist. In the heart of Fayetteville, Georgia, Turnipseed Farms has been in Steven Stinchcomb's family since 1936 when his grandfather started a vegetable farm there. Stinchcomb took it over in 1978 and swapped vegetables for flowers to turn it into a nursery.

Studio Entrance

Steven Stinchcomb has worked as an artist for nearly 20 years. He turned an old storage building on the grounds into an art studio.

Studio

Stinchcomb paints a wide range of subjects including landscapes and animals that he sells at various festivals and galleries in the area. "I try to paint most everything that inspires me," he says.

Landscape

With a recently finished landscape, Stinchcomb just has to add a frame, which he will custom carve out of wood himself. In addition to the paintings he creates in his studio, he also teaches painting classes for ages 14 and up in one of the old greenhouses on his property.

Sculpted Stone

Stinchcomb sculpted this figure out of steatite and copper. This is one of many sculptures residing in his garden.

Blue Accents

Stinchcomb says blue is his favorite color to add to the garden in terms of art or furniture because it contrasts with the greens and flower colors. He built this blue wooden table and benches himself.

Yellow Rudbeckia

Stinchcomb says he just plants whatever he likes and describes the style of his garden as a "collective" one.

Beaded Wind Chime

Although the town of Fayetteville has grown up around Turnipseed Farms over the years, you almost forget about the highway on the other side of the thin row of trees because it's so peaceful. The sounds of wind chimes like this one and the birds, butterflies and bees buzzing around add to the peaceful environment. It's an oasis. "I'm in my own little world here," Stinchcomb says.

Bates Birdhouse Motel

Stinchcomb bought this birdhouse at a yard sale and nicknamed it "Bates Motel" after the motel in Alfred Hitchcock's Psycho.

Shasta Daisies

These friendly daisies grow in large groups at Turnipseed Farms.

Pond Swans

Stinchcomb says he's had swans in the little pond on the property for about 30 years.

Canna Lily

A red canna lily stands out in contrast to the greens and yellows in this garden. 

Artful Arbor

Stinchcomb has collected old scraps of metal, wood, wire, pipes and pretty much any kind of material over the years to give them new life. Like these old metal frames he formed into an arbor. "I knew they would make a great something," Stinchcomb says.

Yellow Zinnia

Zinnias of all colors grow at Turnipseed.

Purple Phlox

Purple phlox adds a whimsical touch to this garden.

Copper Pipe Support

Using copper pipes, Stinchcomb put together a vertical support for this 'Zéphirine Drouhin' rose, giving an industrial touch to the garden.

Styled Sticks

Large sticks Stinchcomb found in the woods frame an arbor above a gate. "I'm a professional stick collector," he says.

Directional Sign

Stinchcomb, who lives in a little white house at the front of the property, lets the public come and go as they please at Turnipseed Farms. He charges portrait photographers a $25 location fee to take photos there. One of the old office buildings from the nursery serves as a dressing room for outfit changes for the many senior, baby or engagement photo sessions held on the property.

Empty Pots

Stinchcomb decided to close the nursery at Turnipseed Farms so he could focus on his art. These pots are some of the many pieces of evidence that a nursery once operated there.

Rooster

In addition to the birds, bees and butterflies Turnipseed Farms attracts, Stinchcomb also has a couple of roosters.

Shady Spots

This grapevine gives a whimsical touch to an arbor that leads down to another planting area. Like many fifth generation Fayetteville natives, Stinchcomb comes from a family of farmers. He grew up working in the fields out in the hot Georgia sun. In 1978, there were hardly any trees, and Stinchcomb planted almost everything on the property today. "I've always said I wanted to grow up and work in the shade," he says. "It took a long time, but I finally work in the shade now."

Bottles Up

Continuing with the color blue, Stinchcomb created this one-of-a-kind bench by setting remnants of wine bottles in concrete. 

Praying Statues

These angel statues are leftover from when Stinchcomb used to sell statues like these in his nursery.