Heirloom Pumpkins

These heritage pumpkins will add interest to your fall decor.
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Photo By: Image courtesy of Baker Creek Heirloom Seeds

Photo By: Image courtesy of Baker Creek Heirloom Seeds

Photo By: Image courtesy of Seed Savers Exchange

Photo By: Image courtesy of Baker Creek Heirloom Seeds

Photo By: Image courtesy of Seed Savers Exchange

Photo By: Image courtesy of Baker Creek Heirloom Seeds

Photo By: Image courtesy of Baker Creek Heirloom Seeds

Photo By: Image courtesy of Jessica Yonker

Photo By: Image courtesy of Baker Creek Heirloom Seeds

Photo By: Image courtesy of Seed Savers Exchange

Photo By: Image courtesy of Baker Creek Heirloom Seeds

Photo By: Image courtesy of Baker Creek Heirloom Seeds

Photo By: Image courtesy of Seed Savers Exchange

Musquee de Provence

This cheese pumpkin — so named because it looks like a wheel of cheese — hails from France and was introduced  to American gardeners in 1899 by Vaughan's Seed Store in Chicago. It features a deep orange flesh and is great for cooking.

Seminole Pumpkins

If you look hard enough, seminole pumpkins can be found growing wild in remote parts of the Everglades. Belonging to the same family as a winter crookneck squash, it has sweet, dry flesh that can be fried, boiled or baked. The vines are resistant to pests and disease.

Amish Pie Pumpkin

Originating from an Amish gardener, this squash produces very large fruit: up to 80 pounds each. As its name suggests, it's great for baking pies and also freezes well. "One would be enough to feed a whole Amish community," says Diane Ott Whealy, co-founder of Seed Savers Exchange, who makes her yearly Thanksgiving pies from this pumpkin variety.

'Omaha'

This oblong, 3-lb squash was grown by the Omaha Indians in the early 1900s. They make cute jack-o-lanterns and its sweet flesh is great in pies.

Rouge Vif d'Etampes

Also known as the Cinderella pumpkin, this French heirloom was introduced to America in 1883 by W. Atlee Burpee. Although the fruit doesn't have the best flavor, it's often grown for its decorative fairy-tale quality.

Marina Di Chioggia

This pumpkin comes from the sea, hailing from Chiogga on the Northeast coast of Italy. Its bumpy, blue-green outer is stunning when used as a fall decoration and its sweet, yellow-orange flesh is great in baking.

Yokohama Squash

This beautiful, dark-green squash was introduced to America from Japan in the late 1800s. Yokohama is revered for its buttery flavor and sweet fragrance.

Jarrahdale

Jarrahdale pumpkins feature beautifully ribbed, blue to gray-green skin with thick orange flesh. They have a long shelf life, making them perfect for centerpieces and decorating.

Sweet Kikuza

'Kikuza' is a Japanese heirloom that produces tan, heavily ribbed pumpkins. Its flesh is sweet, dry and has a slightly spicy kick.

Cheronskaya

This Ukrainian heirloom is an all-around winner. Perfect for baking, it also makes a good carving pumpkin with its ghostly gray shell.

'Black Futsu'

This rare, Japanese squash starts off with a deep, black-green outer that turns a chestnut orange in storage. Its flesh tastes like hazelnuts and in cooking, can be used like an acorn squash.

Galeux D'Eysines

Though this salmon-colored 10- to 15-pound pumpkin is a favorite in French soups, we can't help but think its "warts" are quite bewitching.

Winter Luxury Pie Pumpkin

Introduced by Johnson & Stokes in 1893, this golden 6-pound fruit with sweet, smooth flesh is excellent for pie-making.