Backyard Pictures From HGTV Dream Home 2014

In a home carefully placed to take advantage of mountain views, native plantings and maximum sunlight, the backyard's living and dining spaces celebrate the connection between indoors and out.

Photo By: Eric Perry © 2013, Scripps Networks, LLC. All Rights Reserved

Photo By: Eric Perry © 2013, Scripps Networks, LLC. All Rights Reserved

Photo By: Eric Perry © 2013, Scripps Networks, LLC. All Rights Reserved

Photo By: Eric Perry © 2013, Scripps Networks, LLC. All Rights Reserved

Photo By: Eric Perry © 2013, Scripps Networks, LLC. All Rights Reserved

Photo By: Eric Perry © 2013, Scripps Networks, LLC. All Rights Reserved

Photo By: Eric Perry © 2013, Scripps Networks, LLC. All Rights Reserved

Photo By: Eric Perry © 2013, Scripps Networks, LLC. All Rights Reserved

Photo By: Eric Perry © 2013, Scripps Networks, LLC. All Rights Reserved

Photo By: Eric Perry © 2013, Scripps Networks, LLC. All Rights Reserved

Photo By: Eric Perry © 2013, Scripps Networks, LLC. All Rights Reserved

Photo By: Eric Perry © 2013, Scripps Networks, LLC. All Rights Reserved

Photo By: Eric Perry © 2013, Scripps Networks, LLC. All Rights Reserved

Photo By: Eric Perry © 2013, Scripps Networks, LLC. All Rights Reserved

Photo By: Eric Perry © 2013, Scripps Networks, LLC. All Rights Reserved

Photo By: Eric Perry © 2013, Scripps Networks, LLC. All Rights Reserved

Photo By: Eric Perry © 2013, Scripps Networks, LLC. All Rights Reserved

Photo By: Eric Perry © 2013, Scripps Networks, LLC. All Rights Reserved

Photo By: Eric Perry © 2013, Scripps Networks, LLC. All Rights Reserved

Photo By: Eric Perry © 2013, Scripps Networks, LLC. All Rights Reserved

Photo By: Eric Perry © 2013, Scripps Networks, LLC. All Rights Reserved

Photo By: Eric Perry © 2013, Scripps Networks, LLC. All Rights Reserved

To visually expand the home's modest footprint, architect David Bourke divided the home's gabled wings by a center foyer. Minimizing the center roofline draws attention to the gabled portions of the home.

With a focus on outdoor living, the home offers a central outdoor kitchen, plus two private patios and a second-floor balcony to enjoy mountain views.

The site was dotted with 80- to 100-foot-tall ponderosa and Jeffrey pines, and architect David Bourke worked the placement of the house around the existing trees as much as possible, saving four specimens from the bulldozers.

Wood and veneered fieldstone are among classic mountain home materials utilized in this build.

Private covered patios, which extend from each wing, offer a transitional spot between indoors and out. The fountains are clad in the same material as the outdoor chimney, and slate tile extends from indoor spaces.

This private patio outside the master suite offers an ideal spot to take in the beautiful scenery — from the golf course fairway and ponderosa pine forest to snowcapped, 10,000-foot-high Mount Rose on the horizon.

Walls of windows offer views from almost every angle.

The house contains four moment-resisting steel frames made to withstand any seismic activity.

Exposed steel frames, like those seen here, are a common architectural feature in mountain homes around Lake Tahoe and Truckee, Calif.

The home was carefully set between pine trees to preserve as many native species as possible. Trees that had to be removed were chipped for mulch or sent to a local lumberyard.

Walls of tempered glass blur the line between indoors and out and allow natural light to travel deep into the living space.

Using the same veneered, reddish-brown fieldstone as cladding for patios, the outdoor chimney and the living room fireplace surround further blurs the lines between indoors and out.

Instead of traditional rafters, this roof is made from thick trusses constructed from hefty 3-by-12-inch glued, laminated timber. The trusses are topped with 2-by-8-inch purlines, creating a striking geometric pattern that adds to the home's modern, industrial feel.

The second-floor family room balcony railing is fashioned from stainless steel mesh, steel uprights and wood caps. Mesh encloses the space while keeping views uninterrupted.

Cedar lap siding is naturally resistant to rot and insect damage.

To guard against damage from earthquakes, engineering for the home and size and placement of steel frames were based on seismic zone three, the zone in which HGTV Dream Home 2014 sits.

The home takes on added drama at night, when the warm glow of interior lights highlights the geometric patterns in the all-glass wall framing and steep roofline.

On a clear dark night, the living room patio is flooded with light from interior spaces. Only small pendant lights are necessary to illuminate the space.

Truckee averages about 206 inches of snowfall per year. The roofing system at HGTV Dream Home 2014 is designed to hold 106 pounds per square foot on pitched surfaces and 200 pounds per square inch on flat surfaces.

Excessive moisture means wear and tear. To combat rust and corrosion, exterior steel accents are coated in a layer of matte lacquer to maintain the dark surface.

To prevent damage from snow melt, rooflines are designed so they don't drain over patios. A gutter system directs water to strategically placed drains.

By putting the single story wing to the south and the two-story wing to the north, architect David Bourke ensured that every room in the house gets direct sunlight daily.