14 Spring Garden Trends

Edible gardens, water features and pops of color are all among the top spring looks for gardens.
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Photo By: Photo courtesy of Adza/The Home Depot

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Photo By: Photo courtesy of Danna Cain, Home & Garden Design

Photo By: Photo courtesy of Aquascape


Photo By: Photo courtesy of The Home Depot

Photo By: Photo courtesy of National Garden Bureau

Photo By: Photo courtesy of PH Garden

Photo By: Photo courtesy of For Love of Roses/Chicago Flower Show

Photo By: Photo courtesy of Angie The Freckled Rose Photography

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Photo By: Photo courtesy of Star® Roses and Plants/Conard-Pyle

Photo By: Photo courtesy of Star Roses and Plants/Conard-Pyle

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Big Impact in Small Spaces

Small space gardening, using succulents, herbs and grasses, is a continuing trend. Carmen Johnston, owner of Nectar and Co. in Macon, Ga., says using "patio edibles," such as herbs and small tomato and other plants, work well in container gardens. Courtney Lake, a California interior designer and blogger at Courtney Out Loud, added herbs, cacti, native grasses and succulents, in the Home Depot Patio Style Challenge.

Sculptural Shapes

Find a flowering plant that boasts a beautiful color and shape, such as bleeding heart, says New England gardener Angela Lituri.

For Juice Lovers

The juicing trend is creating more grow-your-own juice gardens with green plants such as kale. If you're trying kale, garden designer Carmen Johnston of Nectar & Co. notes that gardeners in the North likely will have an easier time than folks in the South because of the climate.

Pretty Plan

A fountain amid plants, an arbor and an herb garden are three key trends identified by garden designers for this spring. Using fountains in the garden design is an affordable way to add in a water element, says Danna Cain of Atlanta-based Home & Garden Design.

Water and Fire

When updating your garden, consider adding a water or fire element, or both. The new Spillway Bowls, in a patina finish, from Aquascape were on display at the Chicago Flower & Garden Show

Galvanized Planters

Vertical gardens and galvanized containers are among trends in how to display and grow smaller plants, whether you have a home, condo, townhome or apartment. If using galvanized containers, make sure there is proper drainage with holes at the bottom, says garden designer Carmen Johnston, owner of Nectar & Co. in Macon, Ga. Small galvanized containers also can be carried to garden parties, serving as "portable gardens," she says.

Million Bells

Calibrachoa, which produces flowers that look like small petunias, are big bloomers that produce shades of violet, blue, pink, red, magenta, yellow, bronze and white. It's one plant that is taking off for the spring, says Lorraine Fincher with Hannah's Garden Shop in Birmingham, Ala.

Colorful Container

People want as much color as possible, so using containers in funky colors is in, says Lorraine Fincher, with Hannah's Garden Shop in Alabama. This "Big Belly" glazed earthenware container, in purple, is by PH Garden.

New Roses

Miniature and miniflora roses are big this spring. The Brenna Bosch rose, in a grayish-mauve hue, made its debut at the Chicago Flower Show in March 2015.

Foliage and Flowers

If you desire to add height to your spring garden, Astilbe 'Purple Candles' is the way to go, says Angela Lituri, a New England gardener. Blooming in late spring, Astilbe 'Purple Candles' is also deer and rabbit resistant.

Nature-Inspired Textiles

Botanical prints and nature-inspired fabrics are among trends for textiles in gardens and outdoor spaces. Georgia garden designer Carmen Johnston is seeing more slim and sleek patterns featuring ferns, fauna, butterflies and birds.

Dazzling Displays

Homeowners seek beauty with ease, with options including the low-maintenance Eternal Flame, by Star Roses and Plants/Conard-Pyle. The soft yellow flower was included in a rose garden at the Chicago Flower and Garden Show in March.

Soft Looks

A muted color palette is in, says Georgia garden designer Carmen Johnston of Nectar & Co. The Apricot Candy rose, by Star Roses and Plants/Conard-Pyle, known for its Knock Out and Drift families of roses, features petals that look like ruffled edges.

Get Prepared

New tools can make maintaining plants easier -- and get the party started. The 14 Piece Multi-Tool Bypass Pruner was awarded "cool new product," by The Garden Center Group at the January 2015 Tropical Plant Industry Exhibition. The event was held by the Florida Nursery, Growers and Landscape Association in Fort Lauderdale.