Growing Amaryllis Indoors Is a Tour de Force

Tips for forcing bountiful blooms to brighten dark winter days.
A Perfect Potted Amaryllis

A Perfect Potted Amaryllis

'Apple Blossom' amaryllis plants are a gorgeous pastel pink. Photo courtesy of Longfield Gardens.

Photo by: Image courtesy of Longfield Gardens

Image courtesy of Longfield Gardens

Few plants bring more cheerful smiles indoors during the dark, cold days of winter than the bright, bold blooms of potted amaryllis.

When forced into bloom indoors, these flowering bulbs send up spectacular trumpet-shaped blooms that can reach 10 inches in diameter and delight in a wide array of colors, including red, pink, orange, salmon, white and bi-colors. Each stalk, ranging from 24 to 36 inches tall, can yield two to six lily-like blooms – some varieties produce singles, others doubles.

Amaryllis bulbs can be purchased at garden centers in the fall, either loose or already potted doubles (Note to self: The bulb is poisonous so keep away from kids and pets). When buying individual bulbs, choose large solid ones with no soft spots or other signs of decay.  Select a pot 1 to 2 inches wider in diameter than the bulb and be sure the bottom contains a drainage hole. Place a small amount of well-drained potting mix in the bottom of the container and nestle the bulb into the soil surface, filling in around the bulb so that the upper half of the bulb remains exposed above the soil. Water thoroughly and place the pot in a warm location (70-75 degrees). 

Allow the soil to dry a little (but remaining still moist) before watering again, typically once a week. As green growth appears, move the pot to a sunny window and feed the plant a water-soluble fertilizer, repeating every two to four weeks. As the stalk emerges and grows, turn the pot often to keep the stalk from leaning. 

Typically, flower buds will form and blossom within six weeks of planting. When this happens, move the pot to a cooler location that doesn’t receive direct sunlight, in order to prolong the flowers – and to enjoy this taste of spring while it lasts!

Once the flowers have faded, cut the stalk back to a couple inches above the bulb and return the pot to a sunny window, watering as the soil becomes dry. By late May, the bulb can be transplanted outdoors until next fall. 

Few plants bring more cheerful smiles indoors during the dark, cold days of winter than the bright, bold blooms of potted amaryllis. 

When forced into bloom indoors, these flowering bulbs send up spectacular trumpet-shaped blooms that can reach 10 inches in diameter and delight in a wide array of colors, including red, pink, orange, salmon, white and bi-colors. Each stalk, ranging from 24 to 36 inches tall, can yield two to six lily-like blooms – some varieties produce singles, others doubles.

Amaryllis bulbs can be purchased at garden centers in the fall, either loose or already potted doubles (Note to self: The bulb is poisonous so keep away from kids and pets). When buying individual bulbs, choose large solid ones with no soft spots or other signs of decay.  Select a pot 1 to 2 inches wider in diameter than the bulb and be sure the bottom contains a drainage hole. Place a small amount of well-drained potting mix in the bottom of the container and nestle the bulb into the soil surface, filling in around the bulb so that the upper half of the bulb remains exposed above the soil. Water thoroughly and place the pot in a warm location (70-75 degrees). 

Allow the soil to dry a little (but remaining still moist) before watering again, typically once a week. As green growth appears, move the pot to a sunny window and feed the plant a water-soluble fertilizer, repeating every two to four weeks. As the stalk emerges and grows, turn the pot often to keep the stalk from leaning. 

Typically, flower buds will form and blossom within six weeks of planting. When this happens, move the pot to a cooler location that doesn’t receive direct sunlight, in order to prolong the flowers – and to enjoy this taste of spring while it lasts!

Once the flowers have faded, cut the stalk back to a couple inches above the bulb and return the pot to a sunny window, watering as the soil becomes dry. By late May, the bulb can be transplanted outdoors until next fall. 
Few plants bring more cheerful smiles indoors during the dark, cold days of winter than the bright, bold blooms of potted amaryllis. 

When forced into bloom indoors, these flowering bulbs send up spectacular trumpet-shaped blooms that can reach 10 inches in diameter and delight in a wide array of colors, including red, pink, orange, salmon, white and bi-colors. Each stalk, ranging from 24 to 36 inches tall, can yield two to six lily-like blooms – some varieties produce singles, others doubles.

Amaryllis bulbs can be purchased at garden centers in the fall, either loose or already potted doubles (Note to self: The bulb is poisonous so keep away from kids and pets). When buying individual bulbs, choose large solid ones with no soft spots or other signs of decay.  Select a pot 1 to 2 inches wider in diameter than the bulb and be sure the bottom contains a drainage hole. Place a small amount of well-drained potting mix in the bottom of the container and nestle the bulb into the soil surface, filling in around the bulb so that the upper half of the bulb remains exposed above the soil. Water thoroughly and place the pot in a warm location (70-75 degrees). 

Allow the soil to dry a little (but remaining still moist) before watering again, typically once a week. As green growth appears, move the pot to a sunny window and feed the plant a water-soluble fertilizer, repeating every two to four weeks. As the stalk emerges and grows, turn the pot often to keep the stalk from leaning. 

Typically, flower buds will form and blossom within six weeks of planting. When this happens, move the pot to a cooler location that doesn’t receive direct sunlight, in order to prolong the flowers – and to enjoy this taste of spring while it lasts!

Once the flowers have faded, cut the stalk back to a couple inches above the bulb and return the pot to a sunny window, watering as the soil becomes dry. By late May, the bulb can be transplanted outdoors until next fall. 
Keep Reading

Next Up

Take It Outside: Grow Amaryllis in Your Garden

Try these varieties when you want to bring this popular winter bloom outdoors.

Foolproof Flower: Amaryllis Bulbs Bloom in the Most Unlikely Places

A gardener on HGTV has her amaryllis bulbs thrive, even forgotten in a dark closet.

Amaryllis Flowers

Give your garden a shot of spring color with the exquisite blooms of hardy amaryllis.

Amaryllis Bulbs

Learn the ins and outs of growing and dividing hardy amaryllis bulbs.

How to Force Bulbs Indoors

Plantings of paperwhites can provide continuous indoor blooms.

Growing Ranunculus

These delicate blooms make a big statement in the spring garden.

Growing Amaryllis

Try your hand at growing hardy amaryllis bulbs.

Crocuses Pack a Powerful Punch

Plant these tough little bulbs in the fall for the earliest hint of spring.

Rain Lilies

These lovely lilies lend a silver lining to a wet summer.

Amaryllis Seed

Learn what to do when amaryllis flowers form seeds.

On TV

Living Big Sky

6:30am | 5:30c

Living Big Sky

7:30am | 6:30c

Flea Market Flip

8:30am | 7:30c

Flea Market Flip

9:30am | 8:30c

Home Town

10am | 9c

Home Town

11am | 10c

Fixer Upper

12pm | 11c

Desert Flippers

1:30pm | 12:30c

Desert Flippers

2:30pm | 1:30c

Desert Flippers

3:30pm | 2:30c

Flip or Flop

4:30pm | 3:30c

Flip or Flop

5:30pm | 4:30c

Flip or Flop

6:30pm | 5:30c

Flip or Flop

7:30pm | 6:30c
On Tonight
On Tonight

Flip or Flop

8pm | 7c

Risky Builders

8:30pm | 7:30c

Flip or Flop

9:30pm | 8:30c

House Hunters

10pm | 9c

House Hunters

11pm | 10c

House Hunters

11:30pm | 10:30c

Flip or Flop

12am | 11c

Flip or Flop

12:30am | 11:30c

House Hunters

1am | 12c

House Hunters

2:30am | 1:30c

Risky Builders

3:30am | 2:30c

Follow Us Everywhere

Join the party! Don't miss HGTV in your favorite social media feeds.