How to Make a Pet Feeding Station

Create a custom feeding station that will make eating and drinking easier on your pet. Old wooden crates, boxes or stools can all be converted into a piece that's functional for your best friend and will look great in your home. Note: Some veterinarians warn that raised feeders may cause bloat in large- and giant-breed dogs by allowing them to eat and drink too quickly causing their stomach to fill with air. So this project is not advised for dogs who are at risk for bloat. If in doubt, first check with your vet.
How to Make a Pet Feeding Station

How to Make a Pet Feeding Station

Create a custom feeding station that will make eating and drinking easier on your pet. Old wooden crates, boxes or stools can all be converted into a piece that's functional for your best friend and will look great in your home.

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Materials Needed:

  • found object that is the right height for your pet and can hold 2-3 metal bowls
  • 2-3 metal dog food bowls with rims
  • pencil
  • permanent marker
  • compass or circle cutter
  • drill with 1/2" bit
  • jigsaw
  • sandpaper (optional)
  • polyurethane (optional)
  • paintbrush (optional)

Prepare Found Object

First, consider your pet's height and select an object that is a few inches shorter than his or her muzzle; eating and drinkng from newly raised bowls should be comfortable, so test out a few heights to be sure. If starting with an old box, crate or stool, remove the top. If you're using a piece with an old finish that you want to retain, sand away any chipping or loose paint and apply a coat of polyurethane to prevent further wear. Alternately, you can sand the old finish then cover it with a fresh coat of paint. Tip: When using found objects, always take the time to make them safe to use in a home environment: remove rusty nails, sand wood that could cause splinters and seal chipping paint.

Prepare Found Object

Prepare Found Object

First, consider your pet's height and select an object that is a few inches shorter than his or her muzzle; eating and drinkng from newly raised bowls should be comfortable, so test out a few heights to be sure. If starting with an old box, crate or stool, remove the top. If you're using a piece with an old finish that you want to retain, sand away any chipping or loose paint and apply a coat of polyurethane to prevent further wear. Alternately, you can sand the old finish then cover it with a fresh coat of paint. Tip: When using found objects, always take the time to make them safe to use in a home environment: remove rusty nails, sand wood that could cause splinters and seal chipping paint.

Determine Placement for Bowls

Measure the inside diameter of the bowls with a measuring tape, then determine their placement and spacing on the top surface of the box or other found object that was removed in the previous step (Image 1). Mark where the center point of each bowl will be (Image 2).

Mark Circles for Bowls

Use a compass or circle cutter to draw or score a circle where each bowl will be placed. Make sure each circle is large enough for bowls to easily slide in and out of station for cleaning, but not so large that they fall through. Trace the line with a permanent marker to make the cut line clear.

Mark Circles for Bowls

Mark Circles for Bowls

Use a compass or circle cutter to draw or score a circle where each bowl will be placed. Make sure each circle is large enough for bowls to easily slide in and out of station for cleaning, but not so large that they fall through. Trace the line with a permanent marker to make the cut line clear.

Cut Holes

Using a drill with a 1/2-inch bit, drill a hole just inside one of the marked circles (Image 1). Put jigsaw blade inside drilled hole and cut along marked line (Image 2). Sand edges to smooth. Repeat with other holes. Drop food bowls inside holes to ensure a proper fit (Image 3) and reattach top to box or found object.

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