A Vintage Farmhouse With Style to Spare

HGTV Magazine takes you inside a well-appointed home with style inspired by Fixer Upper.

Photo By: David Tsay

Photo By: David Tsay

Photo By: David Tsay

Photo By: David Tsay

Photo By: David Tsay

Photo By: David Tsay

Photo By: David Tsay

Photo By: David Tsay

Photo By: David Tsay

Photo By: David Tsay

Photo By: David Tsay

The House: A Vintage Farmhouse

Built in: 1919 Size: 2,200 sq. ft. Homeowners: Katrina and Scott Morris

“With all the ideas we got from watching Chip and Jo, our reno felt like we were living a Fixer Upper episode!”

The Aesthetic

For most people, watching Fixer Upper is a sit-back-on-the-couch activity. But for the better part of 2016, Katrina and Scott Morris scribbled away on notepads as they studied the show. The couple had recently bought a three-bedroom Gladys, VA, farmhouse that once belonged to their friend’s parents, with major sentimental value: Katrina and Scott met there as teens. But it wasn’t in great shape, with wood eaten by termites and no heating or cooling.

Although Katrina had an interior design business and Scott owned a commercial construction company, neither had experience with a full home reno. They picked up all sorts of tips from their TV mentors, Chip and Jo: “When we had foundation issues, we felt calmer about it because we’d seen them tackle similar problems on the show!” says Katrina. In eight months’ time, the couple completely transformed their home. “I’ve always related to Joanna Gaines’ style — and that she has young kids,” she says. “Seeing her make over homes made me feel like I could do it too.”

Kitchen

The couple created it from scratch, installing IKEA cabinets with butcher-block countertops and a generous island (also IKEA, with beadboard added for a custom look) that has a stainless steel top like the one in the Gaineses’ home. “It’s perfect for homemade pizza nights,” says Katrina. Open shelving amps up the airiness. The backsplash is white brick veneer paneling from Lowe’s, painted glossy High Reflective White by Sherwin-Williams so it easily wipes clean. “The entire backsplash cost not even 150 bucks,” she says.

Kitchen

On a whim, Katrina painted one wall — with doorways to the pantry and mudroom — black. “I love how it pops against the white trim and highlights the black in the barstools and light fixtures,” she says. A distressed magazine rack from T.J.Maxx that holds produce and an oversize clock from Pottery Barn look like vintage finds courtesy of Joanna herself. The rug is also from T.J.Maxx.

Dining Room

It’s quintessential modern farmhouse, with an antique pine trestle table and a distressed blue hutch, both purchased from a friend who’d bought the pieces secondhand — but then couldn’t fit them in her house. As is Jo’s M.O., Katrina expertly mixed old and new by adding X-back wood chairs from World Market and upholstered host chairs from Boston Interiors. The metal chandelier, from Lowe’s, matches the brackets for the open shelving in the kitchen.

Living Room

Joanna turns to local tradespeople to build unique furniture; Katrina didn’t have to look further than her husband. Scott made the coffee table, with Katrina banging up the wood on top with a crowbar and a metal chain to make it look old. “That was a fun day!” she says. Together they created the fireplace’s faux-log stack — Scott sawed circles from tree limbs and Katrina glued them to a big piece of plywood (they remove it when they build a fire). The walls are painted “the perfect blue gray,” says Katrina. The buffet is a thrift store find; Katrina painted it white and removed the doors to create storage for books and magazines. Their polyester-blend sofa is from Ashley Furniture.

Porch

Katrina and Scott salvaged the existing porch, but she took it to the next level with a floor stencil from Dizzy Duck Designs on Etsy and black and white paint. “I wanted people to walk up to the door and think, Wow! What awaits us inside?” she says. It wouldn’t be a farmhouse without a pair of rockers (from Lowe’s); the glossy red planters are from wayfair.com.

Bathroom

Like Joanna, Katrina is a fan of the impact of contrasting colors in a small space. She painted the first-floor bathroom super-dark gray. “It was gratifying to later see Joanna use a similar shade on the show,” says Katrina. A distressed-looking striped silver mirror found at HomeGoods and polished nickel sconces from Ferguson shine against the wall. She splurged on a faucet by Mirabelle.

Gabe's Bedroom

Chip and Jo would wholeheartedly approve of its eclectic style. The feature wall is made of wood left over from the house reno that Katrina and Scott let weather in the backyard. “Reclaimed wood doesn’t have to be 100 years old,” she says. The daybed, light and rug are from IKEA; a black trunk that belonged to Katrina’s dad serves as a nightstand. She made the curtains with fabric from a local shop, and paired an orange coverlet from Bed Bath & Beyond with black-and-white pillows from Loloi and The Land of Nod. The pouf is from Hobby Lobby.

Girls' Bedroom

Abigail and Avery Grace are surrounded by their parents’ handiwork. To make the headboards, the couple salvaged a door that separated the kitchen and the dining room and cut it in half. Sweet pineapple string lights picked up at Marshalls adorn each one. Inspired by an idea on Fixer Upper, Scott built the window valance to look like an old shop awning, using exterior siding. Katrina spruced up her grandmother’s old dresser with white paint and brass pulls, and spray-painted thrift store lamps gold, then added new shades. The comforters are from Deny Designs.

Master Bedroom

Looking to create a retreat, Katrina went with the living room’s serene paint color and a blue-and-white palette, including a white headboard from her grandmother, pale blue lamps from Boston Interiors, and hits of blue bedding. She layered a jute rug with a wool and cotton one by Magnolia Home by Joanna Gaines. The bench at the foot of the bed is an antique, and the Louis XV chair is a thrift store find Katrina reupholstered herself. “It’s the most calming room in the house since it’s totally free of chaos — except when it’s covered in laundry,” she says.

Shop Related Products