Shoddy Screens

Improve your home's exterior by patching or replacing torn screens.

Window screens are important to let fresh air in while keeping insects out. If a screen rips or weakens, it will need to be patched or replaced. If the hole is three inches or smaller, it can be patched with screen repair kits available at local hardware stores.

For bigger holes or tears, the entire screen should be replaced, which can be an easy do-it-yourself fix. First, lay the outer frame on a smooth surface and remove the rubber edging (spline) and the old torn screen.

Now that you have a blank frame, you’re ready to install the new screen. Roll out, measure and cut a piece of screen one inch larger than the frame. Place the screen and new rubber edging in place over the frame.

Use a screen rolling tool to slowly push the screen and rubber spline into the grooves around the entire frame. Trim away the excess material with a razor or knife and your screen is as good as new.

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