Adding a Basement Shower

Add a shower to your finished basement, and you've got the perfect guest space.

Contemporary Bath with Glass Tile Walls

Contemporary Bath with Glass Tile Walls

Spa blue tile laid in crisp, straight lines forms a focal point in this clean and contemporary bathroom. A wood-tone vanity topped by a clear vase filled with twigs provides an organic, earthy element that grounds the space. Modern vessel sinks pair well with polished chrome fixtures.

Photo by: Geoffrey Hodgdon

Geoffrey Hodgdon

By: Caroline Shannon-Karasik

A finished basement space can be the ideal area for entertaining guests, spending time with family or creating an at-home work space. But a basement can also work doubly hard with the addition of a shower.

Unbelievable Budget Bathrooms

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Splurge Where It Matters

If you want to splurge on one item, find ways to save elsewhere. HGTV fan KarenSpirit bought a slightly damaged clawfoot tub for $90 and a $900 vanity online. The seamless shower doors are a design splurge with fabulous dividends.

A Complete Overhaul For $500

This floor-to-ceiling bathroom makeover cost about $500, including plumbing, electrical and paint. Meredith and Stephen Heard of Welcome to Heardmont removed the popcorn ceilings, then painted the walls and vanity. Meredith even made the striped curtain herself using a flat white sheet and yellow fabric paint.

Goodbye, Basic Beige

A stenciled ceiiling is as dramatic as it is affordable. Michelle Hinckley of 4 Men 1 Lady found this graphic lattice design and stenciled it with beige and the same gray hue used on the walls. The result? A dramatic focal point that's bold and trendy.

Mid-Century Yellow

Just because you have a retro bathroom doesn't mean you need to replace the fixtures and tile. Instead, work with what you have; start by exploring color palettes. HGTV fan mstupski was able to create this fresh bathroom and utilize its mid-century modern bones.

Love What You Already Have

Instead of gutting the old school furnishings and appliances in her 1950s bathroom, HGTV fan oldhousemama embraced the vintage vibe by keeping the original clawfoot tub, pedestal sink and toilet. She kept the paint and tile crisp and gave the room a fun twist with nostalgic artwork and an embellished shower curtain. It can be much cheaper to embrace and polish what you have, instead of gutting your bathroom and replacing everything.

©Photo by oldhousemama from Rate My Space

Stylish Storage

Even bathroom essentials, like tissues, dish towels and toilet paper, can be attractive if displayed correctly. Michelle Hinckley found this metal cabinet at a flea market, then filled it with stylish baskets, jars and lemon-yellow accessories.

Freehand and Nearly Free

HGTV fan KarenSpirit totally transformed her good friend's powder room by hand-painting these stunning blooms. Everything else in the bathroom stayed as is. You don't have to update all of the features and decor in your bathroom to make a noticeable difference. In a small space like this, a bold statement can seem like a total bathroom makeover.

A Little Marble and Molding

HGTV fan mamma4x took a dingy bathroom and turned it into a masterpiece for less than $1,000. To get the look, she used prefab cabinets but added molding for a custom look and replaced hunter-green tile with marble.

Add Tile Where It Counts

The addition of decorative tiles around a vessel sink punched up this otherwise beige and boring bathroom. HGTV fan joeyboti searched his local classifieds to score a deal on the glass tiles and did all of the work by hand. Taking the time to put in a little elbow grease and searching for bargains can keep your bathroom remodel budget in check.

Small Stone Wall

HGTV fan jlgraddy made some smart design choices in this dramatic basement bath makeover. The stone is used on the back wall for maximum visual impact. The vanity was also a bargain find.

Installing a basement shower often comes with the same strings attached as the installation of any basement plumbing, meaning that it often requires the uprooting of concrete. However, if a home was built with the main drain above the basement level, then the installation of a shower will require different steps.

In the event that a homeowner planned to add a bathroom in the future, then a contractor will have installed plumbing stubs. In this case, all that is required is choosing a shower and placing it over the plumbing stubs.

On the other hand, a shower can also be installed in conjunction with an up-flush system which would allow for the concrete to remain in place. An up-flush system works to pump sewage from a holding tank and into the main sewer line.

If a homeowner does plan to break concrete in order to install a basement shower, then it may be necessary to consult an experienced contractor. Digging into concrete requires knowledge about how to provide venting for a drain and avoiding other water systems which could cause future leaks.

Bathroom Makeovers

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