Wanted: Downtown Digs

A suburban bachelor wants to sell his home in order to move to the exciting city.

Tools
Font
  • A
  • A
  • A

E-mail This Page to Your Friends

x

All fields are required.

Separate multiple e-mail addresses with a comma; Maximum 20 email addresses.

Refresh

Sending E-mail

Sending E-mail

Or Do Not E-mail

Success!

A link to %this page% was e-mailed

Hide CaptionShow CaptionThis bathroom needs a complete overhaul.
Homeowner Derwin Hewit is tired of his quiet neighborhood. He wants to sell his suburban Silver Springs, Md., home so he can move to lively, downtown Washington, D.C. His home is situated on a tree-lined street, conveniently located just a few blocks away from the D.C. border. The four-bedroom house is perfect for anyone who wants a home with an office, large master bedroom and a full guest bath.

Real estate expert Terry Haas pays a visit to carefully analyze the home's selling potential. She is very impressed by the beautiful entrance, including the red front door. Her impression quickly changes when she enters the pink-tiled bathroom. Even the toilet is pink! The master bedroom is a good size, but it is a little out of proportion –– all the furniture is on one side of the room. Also, the room is in a bit of disrepair. In one corner, the hardwood floor has a big gaping hole. Haas likes the idea of having the office in a separate room, but the space is stark and cold.

Designer Taniya Nayak agrees with Haas' assessment and devises a plan for fixing all those flaws.

Step 1: Lose the pink tile in the bathroom, and bring in new fixtures.

Step 2: Balance out the lopsided bedroom, and zap out the blemishes.

Step 3: Reconfigure the office so potential buyers can visualize the space as a bedroom as well as an office.

Contractors John Allen and Matt Steele are geared up and ready to get going on this transformation.

The dated look of the pink tile and toilet isn't going to appeal to too many potential buyers. Another big problem is that the room's electrical outlets are not finished. This can be considered a safety hazard.

Advertisement