Toning Down for a Sale

See how the experts tone down an old military house to get it ready for market.

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Hide CaptionShow CaptionThis couple is ready for a move and needs some help getting their home ready to sell.
Homeowners Shana and Tom Greenwich met while serving in Iraq. When they got off active duty nearly two years ago, they got married and bought this cute 1,400-square-foot home. Tom is now a police officer who has been transferred to a new district, so they need to move closer to his job. Their two-bedroom, one-bath home is in an apartment complex that was originally built in the 1960s as military housing for soldiers returning from war.

Real estate expert Brandie Malay arrives to give these homeowners a complete home assessment. In the living room, the bulky furniture makes the already tight space feel even smaller. The faux-finish treatment on the walls looks like camouflage; it is a bit overpowering and makes the room feel closed in. The camouflage walls continue into the dining area. While the dining table is a perfect size for the room, the massive ceiling fan is sure to make buyers do an about-face. Lastly, the kitchen isn't making a cohesive statement — it is just a hodgepodge of bad styling and clutter. Malay also finds the cabinetry outdated, the faux-brick backsplash unattractive and the counter space lacking.

Lucky for this couple, designer Monica Pedersen has a plan to right all the wrongs found in Malay's assessment.

Step 1: Eliminate the camo walls in the living room, and bring in furniture that is more to scale.

Step 2: The dining room should get new lighting, a new buffet and fresh wall paint.

Step 3: In the kitchen, paint the cabinets, lose the faux-brick backsplash and replace the countertops.

Carpenters Robert North and Chad Lopez are armed and equipped with the latest tools and know-how to get the job done.

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