Full-Throttle Remodel

See how our team of experts tones down a bold personality-filled home and neutralizes it in order to make a quick sale.

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Hide CaptionShow CaptionThis couple needs to move to further their careers but they need a bit of help getting their home ready to sell.
Homeowners Julie Jarvis and Snorre Wik both have busy careers in TV journalism. They wants to move from their suburban Maryland home to Washington D.C. so they can be closer to their jobs and enjoy all the amenities of city life. Their split-level home lies just over the D.C. border in a popular suburb that offers a lot of space for the dollar. The five-bedroom home should be an easy sell with its newly renovated kitchen, large basement and extra guest room.

Real estate expert Shirley Mattam-Male stops by to provide a detailed analysis on the home's selling potential. The first thing she notices is that the landscaping needs to be tidied up and weeded out. Mattam-Male finds the red wall color in the breakfast area way too bold. She's also confused by the room's purpose –– there is no kitchen table, just an odd mix of interesting items. Upon descending to the basement, she is overwhelmed by clutter. Again, with so much going on in the space, it is hard to determine what purpose the room serves. Back upstairs, she comments that the spare bedroom reminds her of her dentist's office because it is so stark and white.

Designer Taniya Nayak agrees with Mattam-Male's assessment and has a $2,000 budget to turn these issues into moneymaking possibilities.

Step 1: Create an eat-in breakfast area, and tone down the personality a notch.

Step 2: In the basement, give the room one purpose and make it a huge selling point.

Step 3: Turn the extra room into a warm and cozy bedroom.

Contractors John Allen and Matt Steele are the men with the tools and knowledge to make all these changes happen, and they are ready to get started.

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