How to Prune Climbing Roses

Climbing roses are best pruned in late summer, when you can see the shoots more easily.

Control Sideshoots

Control Sideshoots

When pruing rambling roses, cut back the sideshoots back to 2-4 healthy buds from the main stem.

©2008, Dorling Kindersley Limited

2008, Dorling Kindersley Limited

Step 1: Retain Old Wood

Retain Old Wood

Retain Old Wood

When pruning a climbing rose, retain the old wood, except for any diseased, dead, or weak growth, which should be cut down to the ground or to a healthy bud.

©2008, Dorling Kindersley Limited

2008, Dorling Kindersley Limited

Retain old wood, except for any diseased, dead, or weak growth, which should be cut down to the ground or to a healthy bud.

Step 2: Reduce Sideshoots

Reduce Sideshoots

Reduce Sideshoots

When cutting back climber roses, only prune the sideshoots, reducing them to about two-thirds of their original length. Cut to a bud facing in the right direction.

©2008, Dorling Kindersley Limited

2008, Dorling Kindersley Limited

Only prune the sideshoots, reducing them to about two-thirds of their original length, and cutting to a bud facing in the right direction.

Step 3: Provide Stem Support

Stem Support

Stem Support

When cutting back climber roses, tie in newly-pruned stems horizontally to their supports. This encourages more flowering sideshoots to form along the stems.

©2008, Dorling Kindersley Limited

2008, Dorling Kindersley Limited

Tie in the newly-pruned stems horizontally to their support. This encourages more flowering sideshoots to form along the stems.

Step 4: Trim Longer Stems

Longer Stems

Longer Stems

When pruning climbing roses, cut back stems that are too long and protruding beyond the support.

©2008, Dorling Kindersley Limited

2008, Dorling Kindersley Limited

Prune back any too-long stems that are protruding beyond the support, and sideshoots growing away from it.