Hotel Farm Tour

Loaded with atmosphere, these farm-centric hotels and resorts combine luxury and livestock, growing and glamor.

Photo By: Image courtesy of beall + thomas photography

Photo By: Image courtesy of beall + thomas photography

Photo By: Image courtesy of beall + thomas photography

Photo By: Image courtesy of beall + thomas photography

Photo By: Image courtesy of beall + thomas photography

Photo By: Image courtesy of beall + thomas photography

Photo By: Image courtesy of Carmel Valley Ranch

Photo By: Image courtesy of Carmel Valley Ranch

Photo By: Image courtesy of Carmel Valley Ranch

Photo By: Image courtesy of Carmel Valley Ranch

Photo By: Image courtesy of Carmel Valley Ranch

Photo By: Image courtesy of Carmel Valley Ranch

Photo By: Image courtesy of Los Poblanos

Photo By: Image courtesy of Los Poblanos

Photo By: Image courtesy of Los Poblanos

Photo By: Image courtesy of Los Poblanos

Photo By: Image courtesy of Los Poblanos

Barn at Blackberry Farm

The Amish bank barn dates back to the 1800s and serves as a dining venue where chefs and winemakers host culinary events and demonstrations throughout the year.

Baby Calf at Blackberry Farm

Cows, sheep, pigs, and llama are just some of the livestock on the farm. Every animal pulls its weight and is an important part of the fabric of farm life.

Farmland at Blackberry Farm

The farm and inn sit on more than 4,200 acres in the Smoky Mountains. The story goes that,in 1939, a woman named Florida Lasier snagged her stockings on a blackberry bramble. The name stuck and her husband built a farm on the land.

View from the Mainhouse at Blackberry Farm

Guests can enjoy sweeping views of the property while relaxing in a rocking chair. The farm, which is in Walland, Tennessee, is located 35 miles south of Knoxville.

Sheep at Blackberry Farm

Sheep have roamed Tennessee for centuries and Ryan Burger, the farm’s cheesemaker, relies on them for their milk to create his award-winning cheeses, such as the Singing Brook, a rich aged cheese with a nutty sharpness.

Dusk at Blackberry Farm

The sun sets behind the bank barn and The Larder, where workers, including a cheesemaker and butcher, make their culinary creations using traditional techniques.

Lavender at Carmel Valley Ranch

More than 7,000 lavender plants dot the property's rolling hills. Spa Aiyana, located onsite, incorporates the dried herb into many of its treatments,including the Sweet Lavender Poultice massage,which uses lavender oil to transport your senses to Provence.

Beekeeping at Carmel Valley Ranch

Guests can don beekeeper gear and work directly with the 60,000 Italian honeybees and apiarist John Russo, even sampling honey straight from the hive.

Eat Your Greens at Carmel Valley Ranch

Farm-to-table takes on a new meaning when the salad greens and herbs come from directly outside the dining room. Chef Tim Wood looks to the ranch’s 2-acre organic garden for inspiration when he’s creating his menus, plucking tomatoes, cucumbers and other produce from the on-site farm.

Lobby at Carmel Valley Ranch

The ranch's cozy lobby is home to Roxy, the resident English bulldog, who happily greets guests with a woof and a lick.

Hen House at Carmel Valley Ranch

Fourteen teenage chickens (seven Rhode Island Reds and seven Black Marans)reside inside the hen house, which opened last year as a way to expand the property’s farm experience. Chef Tim Wood plans to incorporate their eggs into meals this spring, once the birds have fully grown.

Vineyards at Carmel Valley Ranch

This year marks the debut of the 3-acre pinot noir vineyard, which will be accompanied by experimental vineyard programming by winemaker Peter Figge.

Harvesting at Los Poblanos

Members of the culinary team pick produce for the evening's dinner service. Volunteers can get their hands dirty and help out on the farm by request.

Greely Garden at Los Poblanos

Landscape architect and horticulturalist Rose Greely created the property's Spanish-style gardens in the 1930s. The garden features Spanish-tile fountains, winding pathways, towering cottonwood trees, and flower beds irrigated with river water, a nod to sustainability long before it was cool.

Radishes at Los Poblanos

Executive chef Jonathan Perno will incorporate these radishes, still damp with soil, into future meals along with heirloom beans, radicchio, kale, fava beans, spinach and other produce grown onsite.

Horse at Los Poblanos

Horses and other livestock can be found throughout the inn's property. Every Saturday in the barnyard, farmer Christine Chavez offers a class on raising farm animals like hens, pigs and cows. Inn guests can try their hand at milking a cow or feeding a baby goat. A suggested donation goes toward feeding the animals.

Chile Peppers at Los Poblanos

Ristras—strings of dried chile peppers—are a popular decorative accent throughout New Mexico. They are tied up and hung to keep rodents from eating them as they dry in the sun.