Tour P. Allen Smith's Garden at Moss Mountain Farm

Find ample inspiration in the lovely home and gardens of lifestyle expert P. Allen Smith.

Photo By: Image courtesy of P. Allen Smith, photography by Hortus LTD

Photo By: Image courtesy of P. Allen Smith, photography by Hortus LTD

Photo By: Image courtesy of P. Allen Smith, photography by Hortus LTD

Photo By: Image courtesy of P. Allen Smith, photography by Hortus LTD

Photo By: Image courtesy of P. Allen Smith, photography by Hortus LTD

Photo By: Image courtesy of P. Allen Smith, photography by Hortus LTD

Photo By: Image courtesy of P. Allen Smith, photography by Hortus LTD

Photo By: Image courtesy of P. Allen Smith, photography by Hortus LTD

Photo By: Image courtesy of P. Allen Smith, photography by Hortus LTD

Photo By: Image courtesy of P. Allen Smith, photography by Hortus LTD

Photo By: Image courtesy of P. Allen Smith, photography by Hortus LTD

Photo By: Image courtesy of P. Allen Smith, photography by Hortus LTD

Photo By: Image courtesy of P. Allen Smith, photography by Hortus LTD

Photo By: Image courtesy of P. Allen Smith, photography by Hortus LTD

Photo By: Image courtesy of P. Allen Smith, photography by Hortus LTD

Garden-Centric

In the Arkansas River Valley near Little Rock, television host and lifestyle expert P. Allen Smith performs some early morning harvesting from his edible gardens at Moss Mountain Farm.

Vertical Color

One of P. Allen Smith’s gardening resolutions for 2014 was to create landscape designs of vertical color in his garden which he accomplished with intriguing combinations like this example of rainbow chard paired with beds of coleus.

Signs of the Season

Want to transform a dining room table into a work of art? Gourds, pears and cauliflower are among the harvested delights that make this seasonal table arrangement a conversation piece.

Frost Defense

“We find that our winter crops do better if we get them planted in late September-early October,” Smith states, “and using frost blankets really help.” Another option for protecting your edible plants from plummeting temperatures is creating small hoop houses or tunnels covered in plastic to shelter them. Just remember to vent them when the sun comes out or the heat generated under the plastic can scorch or damage the plants.

Color Strategies

Plants that produce colorful fruits, vegetables or flowers are even more dazzling when you showcase them in containers or pots that add an additional pop to their visual appeal as in this blueberry glaze planter containing a blueberry bush.

A Misty Morning at Moss Mountain Farm

Pumpkins decorate the walkways between the various beds at Smith’s edible garden in the Arkansas River Valley.

Martinis in the Garden

On Moss Mountain Farm, Smith has two octagonal structures which were created in the Greek Revival style and serve as dining pavilions at outdoor parties or as rustic bars which he refers to as “martini houses.” 

Fields of Plenty

An inspiration for any landscape painter, this inspired version of an edible garden includes a mixture of basil, salvia, rosemary, winter onions, cosmos and Tabasco peppers. 

Sweet Taters

Smith decided to try some different heirloom varieties of sweet potatoes this year and the yield was impressive. “There were ten varieties which were great fun and delicious,” he noted. Among them were the Vardeman, O’Henry, Purple Passion, Murasaki 29 and Beauregard varieties.

Edible Borders

Smith suggests an alternative to the traditional garden landscape design of using boxwoods or hollies as borders. You can use edible plants instead which are not only visually appealing but also produce food such as Top Hat blueberry bushes which can also be grown in containers for patio and courtyard configurations. 

Eye Allure

Here’s one way to add visual interest to your landscape. “We did a big makeover of the vegetable garden,” Smith revealed, “and that’s where I created these vertical elements. We put posts in the center of the raised beds and grew golden hops on them.”

The Kitchen Reborn

One of Smith’s resolutions for 2014 was to renovate his original garden home in Arkansas after it suffered some damage from a severe storm. With the makeover complete, he is particularly pleased with his new kitchen and its soapstone countertops, adding “I love cooking in the kitchen now more than ever. “

Tunnel of Love

The Hyacinth bean vine is an annual flowering vine that grows quickly and produces lovely purple flowers. Smith showcases his vines with tunnel supports which offer a much more original design solution than the standard garden trellis.

Chicken Sentinels

Adding a touch of whimsy and folk art to Smith’s edible gardens are these delightful chicken sculptures which are made of concrete and hand painted.

Coleus in the Dew

Beds of coleus provide rich color and texture amid the early morning mist of this idyllic garden scene from Smith’s Arkansas farm.