Go Green With Small Window Boxes

Plant baby salad greens in stylish window boxes for a beautiful garden accent. 

Cut-and-Come-Again Window Box Lettuce

Cut-and-Come-Again Window Box Lettuce

Cut-and-come-again crops are usually found in the form of leafy green vegetables. These baby veggies and microgreens provide the convenience of multiple harvests from a single planting.

©2011, Dorling Kindersley Limited

2011, Dorling Kindersley Limited

Even without a garden, it is possible to grow a good supply of tasty baby salad leaves. Cut-and-come-again salads are one of the quickest and easiest crops to grow from seed and, when grown in a window box, could not be more convenient to care for and harvest. 

Try growing your own mix of lettuce, Asian greens, and arugula to create a peppery salad, which tastes wonderfully fresh when it has gone from plant to plate in a matter of seconds.

Choosing the Right Materials

Your window box should be approximately 20 x 6 inches  (50 x 15 cm). Choose a window sill where a window box can be secured and has ready access to water. These plants will require full sun or partial shade, and a good multipurpose potting mix.

Types of Cut-and-Come-Again Plants 

  • Mibuna
  • Mizuna
  • Lettuce ‘Oakleaf’
  • Arugula ‘Rocket Wild’

Planting and Aftercare

Choose a window sill in sun or partial shade, which can be reached easily for watering and harvesting. Make sure the window box is secured and has drainage holes in the base. Add a layer of crocks to the box and fill it to within 3/4 inch (2 cm) of the top with multipurpose potting mix. Blend the different seeds together in a bowl and sow thinly from the palm of your hand from mid-spring until late summer. Cover with a thin layer of potting mix and water well. Germination is rapid and the first leaves can be cut with scissors after 3–5 weeks, leaving a 2-inch (5-cm) stump to regrow. Two or three further harvests can be cut at 3–5-week intervals. Water the window box regularly for a healthy crop.

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