15 Favorite Fruits & Vegetables

Make a place for these tried-and-true favorites in your garden and on your plate.

Photo By: Image courtesy of Mary Beth Shaddix

Photo By: Image courtesy of Mary Beth Shaddix

Photo By: Image courtesy of Mary Beth Shaddix

Photo By: Image courtesy of Mary Beth Shaddix

Photo By: Image courtesy of Mary Beth Shaddix

Photo By: Image courtesy of Mary Beth Shaddix

Photo By: Image courtesy of Mary Beth Shaddix

Photo By: Photo by Mary Beth Shaddix

Photo By: Image courtesy of Mary Beth Shaddix

Photo By: Image courtesy of Mary Beth Shaddix

Photo By: Image courtesy of BrazelBerries (c)

Photo By: Image courtesy of Mary Beth Shaddix

Photo By: Photo by Mary Beth Shaddix

Photo By: Image courtesy of Mary Beth Shaddix

©Image courtesy of Mary Beth Shaddix

Strawberry 'Tristan'

This eye-catching pink blossom is a must-have for your patio garden. Grow 'Tristan' in pots or window boxes for a bloom so hot pink that it looks fake. A sweet addition for a children's container garden, too. For a fast headstart, purchase plants from Bonnie Plants.

'Peppermint' Swiss Chard

A standout selection for Swiss chard, this pink-and-white striped 'Peppermint' variety is a tasty novelty known for its resistance to bolt in hot weather. Large, glossy leaves top striped stalks and make a gorgeous ornamental display, as well as an edible one. Try seeds from Renee's Garden or Gurney's.

Strawberry 'Eversweet'

An everbearing variety that continually produces plump strawberries through summer and fall, 'Eversweet' is a reliable performer. Line ornamental and edible beds with plants, or use as a productive groundcover.

'Rose de Berne' Tomato

Who says homegrown tomatoes can't be as pretty as those in the supermarket? This 'Rose de Berne' variety impresses those seeking flavor, but also raises the bar for uniform, round fruits in clusters.

'Hillbilly' Tomato

If flair is what you seek, 'Hillbilly' tomatoes will brighten your dinner platter. Also known as 'Flame', this heirloom slicer variety sports a rainbow of colors and rich, mellow flavor.

'Sungold' Cherry Tomato

This variety makes the top picks year after year, with good reason. 'Sungold' cherry tomatoes have the sweetest flavor when allowed to ripen to a golden orange. Indeterminate plants produce hundreds of tomatoes on vines that will need staking. A consistent winner in tomato taste tests, 'Sungold' should have a sunny spot in your vegetable garden.

'Gypsy' Sweet Pepper

Not a new variety, but a tried-and-true favorite. This All-America Selections winner performs well in much of the country, producing 4" tapered sweet 'Gypsy' peppers that ripen from golden-green to orange to red. Easy to seed and easy to stuff, it's a great variety for many recipes.

'Georgia' Collards

Collards might be just the green to reign supreme this year, kicking kale from the top spot. Not just for the South anymore, collards have appeared on menus nationwide as wraps, sides or sautéed. The 'Georgia' variety has been a cool-season favorite for decades.

Dragon Carrot

Carrots haven't always been orange! Entice children to eat fresh vegetables and love gardening with the 'Dragon' variety. Great flavor and a great surprise when plucked from the soil.

Fall Gold Raspberry

Aptly named, as it sets the most fruit in fall on older canes and is the sunniest shade of yellow gold. This 'Fall Gold' raspberry is extraordinarily sweet and one of the best tasting varieties for fresh eating.

Raspberry Shortcake by BrazelBerries

Perfect for containers, 'Raspberry Shortcake' is a dwarf variety that is thornless. Sweet, pink berries form on second-year canes. It's a trifecta of easy care: no thorns, small space requirements and no staking needed.

Cherry Belle Radishes

'Cherry Belle' radishes add a cheerful spot to a kitchen garden. Grow these to encourage children to garden, as they are easily sown. Also use rows of radishes in between carrot seeds as a marker, as the radishes are quick to germinate.

Sunflowers

A kitchen garden is not complete without these sunny faces bobbing above the rows. Try a dwarf variety, such as Botanical Interests' Elves pack, or skyscraper-tall stalks for wide-eyed wonder. Start from seed easily.  Or, get a headstart with plants in biodegradable pots, such as seed-snackable  'Ring of Fire'.

Red Tropea Onion Bundle

Growing your own onions means a lot more varieties are at your fingertips. Choose seeds, sets, or bundles of young plants. 'Red Tropea' is an oblong bulb onion known for its Italian heritage. Harvest it young for colorful spring onions or let it mature into vibrant purple, egg-shaped bulbs.

Arugula

Dedicate garden space for rows of continually-sown arugula seed, sown every two weeks. Growing your own fresh arugula saves on your grocery bill. If extra spice and bite is your thing, try the new 'Wasabi' variety from Renee's Garden. Pictured is the popular standard roquette type.