Edible Displays: Pepper Pots

Spice up a sunny patio or balcony with a colorful collection of chili peppers and sweet peppers.

Pepper Pots Spice Up Summer Patio or Balcony

Pepper Pots Spice Up Summer Patio or Balcony

These bushy plants make attractive specimens for containers with their small white flowers followed by shiny green fruits which, depending on the cultivar, ripen to brilliant shades of yellow, orange, red and purple. Complement these jewel colors with pots in sizzling tones of orange, cool blue and warm terra cotta. Zesty golden marjoram and trailing Erigeron karvinskianus, with its pretty pink and white daisies that decorate the plant throughout the summer, make perfect partners for peppers, since they thrive in the same well-drained compost and sunny site.

©2012, Dorling Kindersley Limited

2012, Dorling Kindersley Limited

These bushy plants make attractive specimens for containers with their small white flowers followed by shiny green fruits which, depending on the cultivar, ripen to brilliant shades of yellow, orange, red and purple. Complement these jewel colors with pots in sizzling tones of orange, cool blue and warm terra cotta. Zesty golden marjoram and trailing Erigeron karvinskianus, with its pretty pink and white daisies that decorate the plant throughout the summer, make perfect partners for peppers, since they thrive in the same well-drained compost and sunny site.

Materials List

  • seeds

Step 1: Choose Containers

Select pots that are at least eight inches in diameter and suit sheltered patios or balconies, or conservatories or greenhouses. Use multipurpose or soil-based compost and a site with full sun, either indoors or outside.

Step 2: Go Shopping

Buy the following plants: one chili pepper ‘Numex Twilight’, one chili pepper ‘Fresno’, one sweet pepper ‘Sweet Banana’, one Erigeron karvinskianus and one golden marjoram.

Step 3: Plant Peppers

Harden off pepper and chili plants gradually and plant outside after the frosts, or grow indoors. Check pots have drainage holes, and cover them with a layer of broken pot pieces, followed by some compost. Plant a pepper or chili plant in the center of each pot, ensuring that it is planted at the same depth as in its original pot. Firm in, and water. Water when the compost surface dries out and feed every two weeks with tomato fertilizer when fruits appear. Tie fruit-laden plants to stakes for support.

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