How to Repot Fruit Trees

Container-grown fruit trees need regular repotting to give their roots space to grow and to provide them with fresh, nutrient-rich compost.

Repot Fruit Trees Every Two Years

Repot Fruit Trees Every Two Years

A repotted fruit tree will give more space for a growing tree and its roots to have fresh, nutrient rich soil in which to grow. Repotting needs to take place every couple of years as the tree grows.

©2012, Dorling Kindersley Limited

2012, Dorling Kindersley Limited

Step 1: Gently Knock Plant From Pot

Gently Remove Fruit Tree from Nursery Pot

Gently Remove Fruit Tree from Nursery Pot

©2012, Dorling Kindersley Limited

2012, Dorling Kindersley Limited

Larger trees may need to be laid down carefully and pulled by the trunk; ask someone to help you if the pot and root ball are heavy.

Step 2: Tease Out Roots

Tease Out Roots of Fruit Tree to be Repotted

Tease Out Roots of Fruit Tree to be Repotted

While holding tree trunk, gently tease out the roots around the edge of the root ball. Remove some of the old soil at the same time.

©2012, Dorling Kindersley Limited

2012, Dorling Kindersley Limited

While holding the trunk to prevent damaging the branches, carefully tease out the roots around the edge of the root ball. Remove some of the old compost as you go.

Step 3: Trim Roots

Trim Roots of Root Bound Fruit Tree

Trim Roots of Root Bound Fruit Tree

To help prevent fruit tree from becoming root bound, trim the roots using pruners. Select long thick roots and any that have been damaged, remove using a clean, angled cut.

©2012, Dorling Kindersley Limited

2012, Dorling Kindersley Limited

To help prevent the tree becoming pot bound, trim the roots using pruners. Select long, thick roots and any that have been damaged; remove using a clean, angled cut.

Step 4: Fill Larger Pot With Soil

Fill Larger Pot with Soil Based Compost

Fill Larger Pot with Soil Based Compost

Choose a new pot larger than the old pot. Check for drainage holes. Use fresh, soil based compost and firm in tree. Water thoroughly once fruit tree is repotted.

©2012, Dorling Kindersley Limited

2012, Dorling Kindersley Limited

Choose a new pot slightly larger than the old one and check that it has drainage holes. Use fresh soil-based compost and plant the tree so that it reaches the old soil mark on the trunk. Firm, water well, and apply a mulch, if desired.

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