18 Living Christmas Trees

Artificial trees? Get real. Browse our favorite Christmas tree varieties.

Photo By: Image courtesy of The National Christmas Tree Association

Photo By: Image courtesy of Shane Drosi

Photo By: Image courtesy of courtesy Janice LeCocq

Photo By: Image courtesy of The National Christmas Tree Association

Photo By: Image courtesy of Monrovia

Photo By: Image courtesy of Monrovia

Photo By: Image courtesy of The National Christmas Tree Association

Photo By: Image courtesy of The National Christmas Tree Association

Photo By: Image courtesy of The National Christmas Tree Association

Photo By: Image courtesy of courtesy Janice LeCocq

Photo By: Image courtesy of The National Christmas Tree Association

Photo By: Image courtesy of The National Christmas Tree Association

Photo By: Image courtesy of The National Christmas Tree Association

Photo By: Image courtesy of Shane Drosi

Photo By: Image courtesy of courtesy Janice LeCocq

Photo By: Image courtesy of courtesy Janice LeCocq

Fraser Fir

"The Fraser firs are the Cadillacs of Christmas trees," says Bluebird Christmas Tree Farm owner Leo Collins. Fraser firs have sturdy branches that can handle heavy ornaments, wonderful scent and hold their needles long after the holidays have passed.

Fraser Fir

Fraser firs have dark green needles that tend to turn upward, making the whole tree appear compact. The branches are sturdy, so trim away!

Leyland Cypress

A popular variety in the Southeast, the Leyland cypress features soft, vibrant green branches. They have a great pyramid shape and hold their needles long after the holidays have passed.Those sensitive to the fragrance of Christmas trees will rejoice: the Leyland cypress does not produce a strong aroma.

Leyland Cypress

The branches of the Leyland cypress are soft and flat, making the tree very easy to handle; however, avoid hanging heavy ornaments at the tips.

Arizona Cypress

Arizona cypress produces masses of small, gray to silver needles on thin branches. It is native to the Southwest, but is available and grown in many Southern states across the country.

Arizona Cypress

Arizona cypresses are favored for their wintry color and fragrance that is similar to sage. Leo Collins of Bluebird Christmas Tree Farm recommends outfitting your Arizona cypress with white lights for a radiant glow.

'Blue Pyramid' Cypress

'Blue Pyramid' is a variety of Arizona cypress that — as its name suggests — has a beautiful gray-blue color with a pyramid shape.

Balsam Fir

Found in the Northeast, the balsam fir has a cone shape with short but dense branches, dark green needles and a pleasing aroma.

Container Christmas Trees

Don't have any space for a living Christmas tree? Plant one in a container: This Sawara cypress is a slow-growing, fine-textured species of false cypress that has dense, silver to blue foliage that is soft to the touch.

'Blue Wonder' Alberta Spruce

Popular in landscaping, this dwarf spruce has a delightful blue color and forms a tight cone shape. The narrow tree matures at six feet and is great for anyone short on space.

White Fir

White fir, also known as concolor fir, is a long-living tree with small needles and a light green color. It has great needle retention, a bright scent and a round, pyramid shape.

Virginia Pine

One of the most popular Christmas tree varieties in the South, the Virginia pine is a fast-growing conifer with dense, green foliage. Despite the height, Virginia pines have a narrow trunk, making them easy to to fit into tree stands.

Virginia Pine

Virginia pines produce short, stiff pairs of twisted needles. Though its branches will hold heavy ornaments, avoid hanging them near the tips.

White Spruce

White spruce has strong branches that are perfect for hanging heavy ornaments. The short, blue-green needles are stiff, but not sharp; avoid crushing them, as they have an unpleasant odor. Wait to cut or buy white spruce until later in the season — it has trouble holding its needles.

White Pine

White pines are bushy, full trees with long, light-colored needles. If kept watered properly, they last a long time.

White Pine

White pine has soft, feathery needles that make for easy decorating, but the delicate branches won't hold heavy ornaments well.

Monterey Pine

Hailing from Monterey, Calif., the Monterey pine grows fast in coastal locations, producing bushy, bright green foliage. The needles are long and fragrant.

Spanish Fir

Spanish firs are best suited for Christmas trees when they are young — as the tree grows older it loses its cone shape. The silvery-blue needles are dense and very stiff.

Noble Fir

Noble fir, also called red fir, is a popular Christmas tree variety that grows natively in the mountains of the West Coast. The noble fir produces even layers of blue-green needles. The branches are strong and can handle lots of heavy ornaments.

Douglas Fir

A traditional Christmas tree type from Oregon, the Douglas fir is a full-bodied, dark green tree with soft, fine needles and a lovely pine scent. It has a classic Christmas tree shape that can handle lots of ornaments and strands of lights.

Scotch Pine

The Scotch pine is one of the most common Christmas trees in the United States, loved for its dark green color and longevity.

Norway Spruce

Norway spruces are said to be one of the first American Christmas trees. Dark green foliage and stiff needles capable of holding large ornaments make this tree a favorite, but get it into water immediately after cutting to avoid premature needle drop.

Norway Spruce

Norway spruces have strong branches with stiff needles that will support the weight of large ornaments.

Colorado Blue Spruce

Looking for a blue Christmas? The Colorado blue spruce has branches full of stunning silvery-blue needles and a perfect pyramid shape.

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