Mix Houseplants with Holiday Flowers and Plants

Houseplants make great companions for holiday favorites.
Holiday containers

Holiday containers

Photo by: Image courtesy of the Atlanta Botanical Garden

Image courtesy of the Atlanta Botanical Garden

Clockwise, 'Small Talk' red anthurium, chartreuse 'Limelight' dracaena, red poinsettia, rabbit's foot fern, and chartreuse neon pothos.

By now, you’ve probably given up on any intentions of putting up a Christmas tree. Sometimes during the holidays, there just aren’t enough days.

But that doesn’t mean you still can’t bring a little Christmas indoors. Sure, there’s the poinsettia, the Christmas cactus. All good, but why not think outside the box a little when it comes to indoor container gardens?

By combining holiday plants with tropical houseplants you can create a tapestry of color and texture that’s beautiful without necessarily screaming “Holidays!”

Most of these plants can be found in any garden center – dracaena, pothos, philodendron, ferns – and in winter, shelves spill with orchids, amaryllis and kalanchoe, to name a few. Everyone knows that red and green complement each other; take it to the extreme by combining the brightest of reds with chartreusey greens. Then throw is some starkly variegated plants of green and white. The contrasts can be a real eye-opener!

Here are a few ideas for container combinations from Becky Brinkman, manager of the Fuqua Orchid Center at the Atlanta Botanical Garden:

Combo 1: Red poinsettia, chartreuse ‘Limelight’ dracaena, ‘Small Talk’ red anthurium, chartreuse neon pothos and rabbit’s foot fern (Davallia).

Combo 2: Red poinsettia, ‘Pearls and Jade’ pothos, ‘Jade Jewel’ dracaena, ‘Mini Watermelon’ peperomia, accented with small succulents such as echeveria and agave.

Combo 3: Red poinsettia,  white amaryllis, ‘Jade Jewel’ dracaena, double white kalanchoe.

Combo 4:  White moth orchid (Phalaenopsis), rabbit’s foot fern (Davallia), red twig dogwood branches. 

By now, you’ve probably given up on any intentions of putting up a Christmas tree. Sometimes during the holidays, there just aren’t enough days.

But that doesn’t mean you still can’t bring a little Christmas indoors. Sure, there’s the poinsettia, the Christmas cactus. All good, but why not think outside the box a little when it comes to indoor container gardens?

By combining holiday plants with tropical houseplants you can create a tapestry of color and texture that’s beautiful without necessarily screaming “Holidays!”

Most of these plants can be found in any garden center – dracaenapothos, philodendron, ferns – and in winter, shelves spill with orchids, amaryllis and kalanchoe, to name a few. Everyone knows that red and green complement each other; take it to the extreme by combining the brightest of reds with chartreusey greens. Then throw is some starkly variegated plants of green and white. The contrasts can be a real eye-opener!

Here are a few ideas for container combinations from Becky Brinkman, manager of the Fuqua Orchid Center at the Atlanta Botanical Garden:

Combo 1: Red poinsettia, chartreuse ‘Limelight’ dracaena, ‘Small Talk’ red anthurium, chartreuse neon pothos and rabbit’s foot fern (Davallia).

Combo 2: Red poinsettia, ‘Pearls and Jade’ pothos, ‘Jade Jewel’ dracaena‘Mini Watermelon’ peperomia, accented with small succulents such as echeveria and agave.

Combo 3: Red poinsettia,  white amaryllis, ‘Jade Jewel’ dracaena, double white kalanchoe.

Combo 4:   White  moth orchid  ( Phalaenopsis ),  rabbit’s foot fern  ( Davallia ), red twig  dogwood  branches. 

By now, you’ve probably given up on any intentions of putting up a Christmas tree. Sometimes during the holidays, there just aren’t enough days.

But that doesn’t mean you still can’t bring a little Christmas indoors. Sure, there’s the poinsettia, the Christmas cactus. All good, but why not think outside the box a little when it comes to indoor container gardens?

By combining holiday plants with tropical houseplants you can create a tapestry of color and texture that’s beautiful without necessarily screaming “Holidays!”

Most of these plants can be found in any garden center – dracaenapothos, philodendron, ferns – and in winter, shelves spill with orchids, amaryllis and kalanchoe, to name a few. Everyone knows that red and green complement each other; take it to the extreme by combining the brightest of reds with chartreusey greens. Then throw is some starkly variegated plants of green and white. The contrasts can be a real eye-opener!

Here are a few ideas for container combinations from Becky Brinkman, manager of the Fuqua Orchid Center at the Atlanta Botanical Garden:

Combo 1: Red poinsettia, chartreuse ‘Limelight’ dracaena, ‘Small Talk’ red anthurium, chartreuse neon pothos and rabbit’s foot fern (Davallia).

Combo 2: Red poinsettia, ‘Pearls and Jade’ pothos, ‘Jade Jewel’ dracaena‘Mini Watermelon’ peperomia, accented with small succulents such as echeveria and agave.

Combo 3: Red poinsettia,  white amaryllis, ‘Jade Jewel’ dracaena, double white kalanchoe.

Combo 4:   White  moth orchid  ( Phalaenopsis ),  rabbit’s foot fern  ( Davallia ), red twig  dogwood  branches. 

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