15 Unusual Houseplants

Instead of a run-of-the-mill houseplant, choose something out-of-the-ordinary. Check out these unusual varieties.

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Photo By: Photo by Lisa Steinkopf

Photo By: Photo by Lisa Steinkopf

Photo By: Photo by Lisa Steinkopf

Photo By: Photo by Lisa Steinkopf

Photo By: Photo by Lisa Steinkopf

Photo By: Photo by Lisa Steinkopf

Photo By: Photo by Lisa Steinkopf

Photo By: Photo by Lisa Steinkopf

Photo By: Photo by Lisa Steinkopf

Photo By: Photo by Lisa Steinkopf

Photo By: Photo by Lisa Steinkopf

Photo By: Photo by Lisa Steinkopf

Photo By: Photo by Lisa Steinkopf

Photo By: Photo by Lisa Steinkopf

Photo By: Photo by Lisa Steinkopf

Disocactus ramulosa ‘Bill’s Red’

The more sun you put this plant in, the more color it shows. The flowers turn into the little white “pearls” on the edges of the leaves. 

Haerella odorata

This miniature orchid blooms consistently and often. Placed in a West window with plenty of humidity and a thorough soaking once a week, it is very happy. Fertilize with a weak solution of fertilizer once a month from March through August. 

Episcia ‘Cleopatra’

This gesneriad, or African violet cousin is grown for its fabulous, colorful foliage. It will flower, but they pale in comparison to the foliage. These plants need very high humidity and so are best suited to a large terrarium. 

Hoya multiflora or Shooting Star Hoya

This beautiful blooming plant is very easy to grow and flower in a bright window. Keep it evenly moist and let it stay in tight quarters as hoyas prefer their roots to be snug in the pot. 

‘Pink Cadillac’ Euphorbia or Crown of Thorns

This is an almost continual blooming plant if kept in a bright window. Let it dry down between waterings as this is a succulent plant and it could rot if it is too wet. 

Ornithogalum longbracteatum or Pregnant Onion

This plant will be a conversation piece in your indoor garden. The long strappy leaves are nice but the large bulb with its “babies” is the interesting part. Bright light and moderate water is all that it needs. 

Anthurium plowmanii or Bird’s Nest Anthurium

This isn’t the anthurium we are used to with the bright patent leather-like flowers. This large plant is grown for its attractive huge wavy leaves. Low to medium light with moderately moist soil is all that is necessary to keep this plant happy. 

Pedilanthus tithamyloides ‘Lime Zinger’ or Devil’s Backbone

This West Indies plant has far from usual stems. They are zig zag shaped, thus the devil’s backbone name. As this is a succulent plant it needs to be kept moderately dry and needs to be in full sun to keep its variegation. 

Sansevieria hallii or Baseball Bat Sansevieria

Most people don’t realize that there are hundreds of species of sansevieria. This one has large thick stems instead of the flat ones we are used to. They prefer to be in very bright light and let them dry out between waterings. 

Davallia fejeensis or Rabbit’s Foot Fern

This fern looks like a taupe colored tarantula with fern fronds growing out of it. The fuzzy rhizomes are definitely the attraction of this plant. It needs high humidity and constant moisture. 

Cleisocactus winteri

This very spiny cactus isn’t anything exciting until these peach flowers appear. Then the wows start. Put it in as much sun as you can and let it dry down before watering again. 

Euphorbia francoisii

This caudex forming succulent has spiky stems and shiny wavy leaves. It is very slow growing but the end result is worth the wait. Let it dry down between waterings. 

Gasteria armstrongii

This thick leaved succulent is less sun-loving than other succulents, making it perfect for windowsill culture. It is very drought tolerant, but do not let it dry out completely. 

Platycerium bifurcatum or Staghorn Fern

These epiphytic ferns need high humidity and bright, indirect light, never full sun. Do not let the roots dry out and keep in a warm spot. Quite often these plants are grown on a slab of wood. 

Columnea ‘Firebird’

This South American epiphytic gesneriad or African violet cousin needs bright, indirect light to bloom prolifically. It is a great candidate for a hanging basket, keep it slightly potbound, and pinch the ends regularly to keep it more compact.