15 Perennial Vines

Insert vertical interest into your landscape with perennial vines.
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Photo By: Image courtesy of Bailey Nurseries, Inc.

Photo By: Image courtesy of Bailey Nurseries, Inc.

©2008, Dorling Kindersley Limited

Photo By: Image courtesy of SelectSeeds.com

Photo By: Image courtesy of Bailey Nurseries, Inc.

Photo By: Image courtesy of Bailey Nurseries, Inc.

Photo By: Image courtesy of Bailey Nurseries, Inc.

Photo By: Image courtesy of Bailey Nurseries, Inc.

©2008, Dorling Kindersley Limited

©2008, Dorling Kindersley Limited

Photo By: Image courtesy of Bailey Nurseries, Inc.

©2011, Dorling Kindersley Limited

Photo By: Image courtesy of Bailey Nurseries, Inc.

©2011, Dorling Kindersley Limited

Bees Jubilee Clematis (Clematis ‘Bees Jubilee’)

This large-flowered clematis unfurls blooms with mauve-pink petals striped in deeper pink. Blooms appear from mid- to late spring into early summer and again in fall. Clematis vines climb by wrapping leaf stems around supports. Since leaf stems aren’t too thick, provide thinner supports, like twine, fishing line or a metal trellis. Bees Jubilee reaches 8 to 10 feet and is hardy in Zones 3 to 9.

Honeysuckle

This fragrant vine is also a real magnet for hummingbirds and grows well in full-sun though they will tolerate shade.

Passion Flower

This vigorous climber flowers from summer into fall.

Perennial Sweet Pea (Lathyrus latifolius)

If you love sweet peas, consider adding the perennial version to your garden. You’ll enjoy the same beautiful blooms non-stop from spring to fall frost—although these blossoms lack fragrance. This vine is an aggressive, rapid grower, climbing by tendrils to as high as 9 feet. It’s the perfect cover for a chain link fence. Vines are hardy in Zones 3 to 8.

Nugget Ornamental Hop (Humulus lupulus ‘Nugget’)

This hop vine produces pine-scented blooms that beckon butterflies. Flowers are tucked inside strings of bracts known as hops, which mature in late summer and are the same type used to make beer. Vines climb by twining, wrapping themselves around supports. Hops will easily ascend to 20 feet in full sun to part shade. Plants are hardy in zones 3 to 8 and die to the ground each winter. Cut stems back after tops die.

Trumpet Vine (Campsis radicans)

Hummingbirds can’t resist the orange tubular blooms that blanket this vine starting in summer. Vines climb by twining stems, reaching 20 to 40 feet. This is a vine that can easily ascend telephone poles in a growing season. Provide sturdy supports in full sun for best flowering, although vines will grow in part shade. Plants are hardy in Zones 4 to 9.

Issai Hardy Kiwi (Actinidia arguta ‘Issai’)

You’ll enjoy fruit and pretty variegated leaves on this hardy kiwi, which produces small seedless fruit. For more and larger kiwis, plant a male vine, as well. Give this climber a strong support in the warmer end of its hardiness range, because vines can reach 15 to 25 feet. Full sun to part shade is best. Vines are hardy in Zones 4 to 8.

Summer Cascade Wisteria (Wisteria macrostachya ‘Betty Matthews’)

Dangling flower clusters appear on vines in early summer, opening dark lavender blooms that fade to white. Vines climb by twining stems around supports and easily rise 15 to 20 feet. Provide a sturdy support in full sun. This wisteria boasts excellent winter hardiness, surviving in Zones 4 to 8.

Climbing Hydrangea

This vigorous wall-climbing hydrangea variety has large, white flowerheads and leaves that turn from green to gold in fall.

Common Allamanda (Allamanda cathartica)

Also known as golden trumpet, this tropical bloomer flowers non-stop from summer into fall. These vines must be trained to supports, but once they’re on track, stems can soar 10 to 20 feet in warmest regions. Vines are hardy in warmest areas only—Zones 10 to 11. In other regions, allamanda is typically grown as a container annual and overwintered indoors. Stems do release a milky sap when broken that can irritate skin.

Boston Ivy (Parthenocissus tricuspidata)

Boston ivy climbs by clinging, attaching itself to surfaces using suckers. It quickly clambers up fences, walls or trellises, soaring 30 to 50 feet. Vines grow best in full sun, but tolerate light shade and are hardy in Zones 4 to 9. Fall color is a striking blend of red, scarlet and purple hues. Use caution growing on house walls because vines will slink behind wooden shingles, gutters and fascia boards.

Bignonia Capreolata 'Tangerine Beauty'

These easy to grow vine is semi-evergreen to evergreen and boasts gorgeous tangerine-colored blooms.

Confederate Jasmine (Trachelospermum jasminoides)

Also known as star jasmine, this vine opens white, starry blooms that appear in clusters in spring and summer. Flowers bear a strong perfume and are a favorite of bees. Vines climb by twining stems and form a thick canopy of evergreen foliage. With support, vines can reach 20 feet. This is a great vine to cover an unattractive fence. Plants are hardy in Zones 8 to 10.

Engelman Ivy (Parthenocissus quinquefolia var. engelmannii)

This leafy vine is a hybrid of Virginia creeper and makes a nice choice for beginners. It grows rapidly, tolerating any amount of sunlight and any kind of soil. Vines climb by means of specialized suckers that attach to fences, tree trunks, walls or trellises. In autumn, leaves blaze a sizzling red and fall after frost. Vines are hardy in Zones 3 to 9. Use caution growing on house walls because vines will slink behind wooden shingles, gutters and fascia boards.

Chocolate Vine (Akebia quinata)

Chocolate-maroon tinted blooms with an exotic vanilla scent appear on vines in spring. The waxy blooms are eye-catching, as are the lobed leaves. Rapidly growing vines climb by twining and ascend 20 to 40 feet. Plants are hardy in Zones 4 to 8 and tolerate full shade. Unfortunately, this vine has become invasive in many regions. Check with invasivespeciesinfo.gov/plants before planting.