How to Propagate Strawberries

Enjoy a continuously flourishing strawberry garden by properly propagating your plants.

Strawberry Patch Provides Bounty of Sweet Fruits

Strawberry Patch Provides Bounty of Sweet Fruits

Strawberries announce the arrival of summer, bearing juicy red fruits loaded with sweet flavor. They are among the most versatile fruits to grow. Simply pluck them from the garden and enjoy.

©2009, Dorling Kindersley Limited

2009, Dorling Kindersley Limited

Materials Needed

  • strawberry plant runners
  • compost
  • small pots
  • watering can

Step 1: Identify Runners

Lift Up Attached Runners from Parent Plant

Lift Up Attached Runners from Parent Plant

Growing strawberry plants from a runner is the easiest and quickest way to propagate strawberries. Horizontal stems are sent outward from the base of the plants. Direct runners so that the roots will grow down into a separate, moveable container.

©2011, Dorling Kindersley Limited

2011, Dorling Kindersley Limited

When runners start to develop in the summer and the young plantlets have strong leaves, lift them from the soil, but leave them attached to the parent plant. Propagate only healthy runners, and remove the rest to encourage plants to concentrate their energy on producing fruit.

Step 2: Plant Runners

Sink Small Pots Next to Parent Strawberry Plant

Sink Small Pots Next to Parent Strawberry Plant

Any small container filled with a sandy loam soil will work to propagate strawberries. Bury it so that the strawberry plant runner will stay at ground level so that it is more easily removed once the new strawberry plant is well rooted and established.

©2011, Dorling Kindersley Limited

2011, Dorling Kindersley Limited

Sink small pots filled with potting compost into the soil. Plant one plantlet per pot, keeping them in place with bent wire staples. Keep them well watered.

Step 3: Plant Outside

Separate Runner from Parent Once Plant has Rooted

Separate Runner from Parent Once Plant has Rooted

Once the strawberry root has established the new clone plant, separate the new plant from the mother strawberry plant by snipping the runner. As long as the new plant is well rooted, no growth will be hindered by snipping or snapping the runners.

©2011, Dorling Kindersley Limited

2011, Dorling Kindersley Limited

After 4–6 weeks, the plantlets will develop roots of their own and can be separated from the parent. Grow them on their own, potting and planting outside as necessary.

Keep Reading

Next Up

How to Propagate Succulents

Don't buy another plant—creating new succulents from existing leaves couldn't be easier.

How to Propagate Ferns

Ferns are easy to propagate. Follow these steps to put more green in your garden—and your wallet.

How to Propagate Plants

When seeds are unable to reproduce naturally, propagating helps you make more plants. 

How to Freeze Strawberries

Start a frozen strawberry treasure-trove with these easy instructions.

How to Propagate Blackberries

Build a healthy and bountiful blackberry garden with this simple two-step process for propagating the plant. 

How to Propagate with Semiripe Cuttings

Semiripe cuttings are often used to propagate climbers, conifers, tender perennials and shrubs that do not grow well from hardwood cuttings.

How to Sow and Plant Fruiting Vegetables

Large leaves, golden flowers and heavy yields make squashes, zucchini and cucumbers ideal plants for productive pots.

How to Make a Fresh Berry Fruit Punch

Fresh currants are a wonderful addition to fruit salads, or a refreshing drink like this berry fruit punch.

Divide and Conquer: How to Propagate Perennials

Many perennials outgrow their space or lose vigor with age. Revive plants by dividing them when dormant and replanting.