Winter Wedding Flowers

Make your special day even more memorable by selecting seasonally-fresh flowers for a winter wedding.
For a Winter Bride

For a Winter Bride

A wintry palette is created in this elegant bouquet by using white 'Avalanche' roses, white freesias, white trachelium and eucalyptus stems.

©2011, Dorling Kindersley Limited

2011, Dorling Kindersley Limited

Celebrate your nuptials in sophisticated style with winter wedding flowers. Winter presents an elegant setting for a wedding ceremony. Its seasonally-spare scenery allows winter flowers to sparkle and shine. By focusing on seasonally-fresh winter wedding flowers, you can create one-of-a-kind memories even on a shoestring budget.

While you might think that winter wedding flowers consign you to a palette of white, you’ll be delighted to discover that you can draw from a wide variety of hues just by using seasonally-fresh floral material. Flowers that thrive in the year’s cool season include familiar faces, like tulips and snapdragons, both of which unfurl petals in a rainbow of hues, from deep burgundy-black to sunny yellow. Both of these blooms boast stems that are easily wired or directed into geometric shapes, making them perfect choices for dramatic bouquets.

Romance abounds when you select winter wedding flowers from cool-season blooms. Fully-petalled ranunculus, velvety anemone, delicately-perfumed sweet peas and deep blue Dutch iris are all regular players on the cool-season flower roster. For tall spikes in shades of blue and pink, look for larkspur and delphinium. Lupine also offers spiky blooms, but in myriad tones, from purple, to red, to butter yellow.

15 Striking Plants for Winter Color

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Cabbages and Kales

Ornamental kale and cabbage are some of the most popular winter annual plants. They lend a completely different texture to a winter landscape bed. Once the plants are hardened by cooler night temperatures they can survive most cold winters.

©2011, Dorling Kindersley Limited

Camellias

Camellias prefer acidic, moist yet well-drained soil that is high in organic matter. They flower in the fall and winter when their display of colorful blooms is most appreciated. The waxy-petalled flowers linger long on plants, displaying shades of red, pink, coral, white and bicolors. Plants are evergreen, growing to form shrubs or small trees. Once established, camellias are drought-tolerant.

©2011, Dorling Kindersley Limited

Winter Jasmine

Jasminum nudiflorum or winter jasmine is an exceptionally trouble-free plant to grow.

Holly Bush

Hollies bring an eye-catching display of evergreen leaves that is often punctuated with bright red or gold berries.

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Winterberry Holly

Winterberry hollies are deciduous, and the berry-bedecked branches truly stop traffic. (Even this lizard stopped to take a gander at the beautiful berries!)

Cotoneaster

Cotoneaster is another leafy evergreen that you can depend on for a dazzling berry show in even frigid winters. It's a fast-grower and can be used as a striking groundcover.

©2009, Dorling Kindersley Limited

Japanese Maples

Japanese maples often have artistically shaped trunks. The contorted branches on this shrub or small tree come into focus as winter arrives.

Nandina

Nandina shows off its berries in areas with milder winters. Tuck these plants in front of solid backdrops so the berries can shine.

Native Serviceberry

Native serviceberries also earn rave reviews for snow-covered branches. Watch for white blossoms in spring, followed by tasty berries in June. Birds love the berries, so if you want any for a pie, net trees. Fall color features shades of red and orange.

Doublefile Viburnum

Doublefile viburnum has a symmetrical, tiered branch structure that’s beautiful when covered with snow.

Red- and Yellow-Stemmed Dogwood

Red and yellow twig dogwood each inspire with their colorful winter stems, which show up best against dark evergreens or a snowy landscape.

©2011, Dorling Kindersley Limited

Witch Hazel

Witch hazel, a native shrub or small tree, opens strappy flowers in late winter to early spring. The blooms offer shades of yellow or orange and a sweet fragrance. Fall foliage is a striking gold, so this plant pulls double-duty in terms of seasonal interest.

©2011, Dorling Kindersley Limited

Star Magnolia

Star magnolia opens pale blush to white flowers with a sweet fragrance in late winter to early spring.

Photo By: Image courtesy of Ben Ford

Snowdrops

Close out winter with a flourish of color, courtesy of bulbs and perennials. Snowdrops grow from bulbs and return reliably year after year. Make sure to plant the bulbs during fall to give them the chilling period they need to bloom.

Lenten Roses

Lenten roses (hellebores) offer leathery evergreen leaves accented with rose-like flowers in shades of pink, red, maroon, chartreuse and white. Plants self-sow readily, forming low-maintenance colonies.

You might be able to find cut bleeding-heart blooms in shades of pink or white. These richly-romantic flowers last from 12 to 17 days in a vase. They’ll provide a long-lasting memory of your wedding day bliss. Pair them with a delicate fern or ivy to let them steal the show.

Complement winter wedding flowers with seasonally-available greenery, such as boxwood, rosemary, ivy, scented geranium (in warmer zones) and pittosporum, to keep your arrangements cost-conscious but nonetheless beautiful. You can add florist-supplied hypericum berries, pink pepperberries and tallow berries to interject contrast and drama. Lamb’s ears are often available in winter. Their silvery tone provides a beautiful backdrop and accent to other winter wedding flowers.

A winter marriage ceremony also provides the perfect place to highlight evergreens. Simple arrangements spotlight greens’ textural drama and subtle shadings. Consider sprigs of juniper, cedar, holly, pine, fir and arborvitae. Tuck in a few pine cones—in natural tones or painted in wintry silver—and you have the makings of memorable bouquets.

For a wedding with a holiday color scheme, draw upon the classic Christmas flower, poinsettia. Breeders have actually developed poinsettias for use as cut flowers that boast a vase life of 21 days. Ask your local floral supplier to source ‘Renaissance Red’ or ‘Renaissance White’ poinsettias. You might also be able to locate cut amaryllis blooms, which look rich and exotic when paired with paperwhite narcissus and feathery marabou.

White winter flowers are perfect choices for a cool-season wedding. Look for white ranunculus, white anemone, white snapdragon, and white freesia to stage a snowy bouquet. White ranunuculus can stand on their own as bridal nosegay, especially when you use blossoms in various stages of opening and petal display.

If you work with a florist who sources winter wedding flowers from a combination of local, national and international growers, your floral palette is limitless. Roses, chrysanthemums, hydrangea, button mums, alstroemeria, lilies—you can select winter wedding flowers to celebrate your ceremony with floral fanfare.

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