Blooming Favorites and Their Distant Cousins

Are you aware that many of the traditional spring-blooming ornamental trees and vines offer somewhat lesser-known colors of blooms as well? Here are some of their alternative colors.

©2011, Dorling Kindersley Limited

©2008, Dorling Kindersley Limited

©2011, Dorling Kindersley Limited

©2013, HGTV/Scripps Networks, LLC. All Rights Reserved.

©2011, Dorling Kindersley Limited

©2011, Dorling Kindersley Limited

Dogwood

One of the most common spring-flowering trees is the white dogwood.

Dogwoods

The flowers of dogwoods actually consist of four white bracts.

Pink dogwoods

A less common type of dogwood are the pink and red varieties.

Pink dogwoods

Pink- and red-blooming dogwoods offer the same graceful branching that their white-blooming cousins do.

Wisteria

Wisteria is a member of the pea family of plants and considered invasive in many parts of the United States.

Wisteria

There are 10 species of this woody climbing vine, which requires an arbor or other strong structure for support.

Wisteria

The most common color of wisteria is the familiar violet-blue.

White wisteria

A less common species of wisteria blooms in white, such as this 'Alba' cultivar, and is extremely fragrant.

White wisteria

White wisteria is a Chinese species and, like its violet cousin, considered invasive in many areas.

Redbud

Redbuds typically are actually light to dark magenta. There also are pink- and lavender-blooming varieties as well.

White redbud

White redbuds, such as this 'Alba' cultivar, have the same heart-shaped leaves of the more common redbuds, which emerge bronze then turn green in summer, yellow in fall.

White redbud

From a distance, the blooms of white redbuds resemble popcorn. The tree sports the same elegant branching characteristics of the common redbud.

Japanese maple

Many varieties of Japanese maple emerge a dark purple or deep red in spring before turning green in summer.

'Sango-Kaku' Japanese Maple

The leaves of 'Sango-kaku' are yellow in spring, then green, then a blaze of golden-orange in the fall. It's often referred to as the coral bark Japanese maple thanks to its brilliant red bark that intensifies as the temperatures drop.