Q&A: Browning Indoor Herbs

If your plants are getting less sun, they might also need less water.

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Q: Three weeks ago I planted some herbs in containers indoors. The base and the leaf tips of the rosemary, peppermint and sage have now started to brown. Can you help?
— L.M., Evanston, Ill.

A: Your plants are sun lovers that are craving the real thing, and they also need good air circulation. Since these plants are usually grown outside, try to maximize the amount of light they receive and cut back on water and fertilizer.

Simultaneous browning at the base and the leaf tips is usually a sign of overwatering and/or overfeeding. Plants tend to balance their water and nutrient needs against the amount of light they get; less sun means less water and nutrients. Plus, the rosemary and sage are both lighter feeders than the mint, so keep that in mind too.

— National Gardening Association

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