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How to Make a Homegrown Stone Pot

The bigger a pot, the more it costs. Why not make your own inexpensive container, one that can withstand the test of time and the elements?

Susan Morgan

Patterned after the real stone troughs once used to water livestock in England, the modern-day hypertufa trough is considerably more lightweight and can be fashioned into a variety of shapes, sizes and colors, as determined by its creator — you. Due to the durable materials with which they're constructed, these containers are able to withstand the elements and only look better with time. Once you get the hang of constructing these homemade containers, you'll be making them in no time at all.

Hypertufa Trough

Due to the durable materials with which they're constructed, these containers are able to withstand the elements and only look better with time.

Gather Materials

Be sure to gather all of your materials prior to starting this project.

Prepare the Mold

Prepare your mold ahead of time so you can easily dump the mix into it when ready.

Combine Dry Ingredients

If you desire a more textured look on the outside of the trough, screening is not necessary.

Thoroughly Mix

If you choose to include a dye, add enough so that the entire mixture is colored.

Add Water

Be careful to add just the right amount of water to your mix.

Mix Dry and Wet Ingredients

You can adjust your consistency by adding either more water or more mix until it is just right.

Add Mix to the Mold

Pack your mold from the bottom up.

Pack Mixture Into Mold

Pack the mixture firmly into the mold and begin to smooth the rim.

Insert Dowels for Drainage

Wooden dowels allow for drainage.

Add Decorative Materials

Avoid using objects with smooth surfaces, such as marbles, because they have a tendency to break loose.

Remove From Mold

Be sure to remove the trough from the mold carefully.

Use Wire Brush for Finishing

To age more quickly, douse the outside with manure tea, diluted buttermilk or yogurt.

Ready to Plant

Once your trough has fully cured, you are ready for planting. First, place a small piece of screen or pantyhose over the drainage holes to keep soil from washing away.

Get Creative

If you have any leftover mixture, use it to create "feet" for your trough to aid in drainage. Or make your own garden art.

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