Room Transformations from the Property Brothers

Property Brothers Drew and Jonathan Scott specialize in helping make home-makeover dreams a reality — as seen in these dramatic room transformations.

Picturing the Possibilities

LIVING ROOM, BEFORE: The living room in this home was spacious, but the dark wood paneling had not been updated since the house was built in the 1970s.

Picturing the Possibilities

LIVING ROOM, AFTER: The Property Brothers updated the living room by removing the wood paneling and adding some color. They also pulled up the carpet and replaced it with wood floors. Drew and Jonathan made sure to include several personal items from the new owners in the overall design to keep the room cozy.

Picturing the Possibilities

ENTRY/LIVING ROOM, BEFORE: The wood paneling in this entry is too dark and outdated.

Picturing the Possibilities

ENTRY/LIVING ROOM, AFTER: The Property Brothers removed the wood paneling and added color, bringing in new mirrors and accessories combined with an old clock that's been in the couple's family for generations.

Picturing the Possibilities

KITCHEN, BEFORE: The kitchen was saddled with drab wood cabinets and surfaces, and the original appliances were approaching retirement age.

Picturing the Possibilities

KITCHEN, AFTER: The revived kitchen features bright new cabinets, a tile backsplash, beautiful granite countertops and stainless steel appliances.

Picturing the Possibilities

KITCHEN/DINING ROOM, BEFORE: The wood paneling and aging yellow wallpaper of the dining room area was not going to suit the tastes of a young, modern couple. And the claustrophobic kitchen was being contained by low-hanging cabinets.

Picturing the Possibilities

KITCHEN/DINING ROOM, AFTER: The Property Brothers took down the low-hanging cabinets and opened up the entire space, creating an open-concept, eat-in kitchen.

Picturing the Possibilities

DINING ROOM, BEFORE: The original dining room was an unusual space, with a walk-through from the front door to the garage and laundry room.

Picturing the Possibilities

DINING ROOM, AFTER: Closing off the entry from the front door and laundry room makes the dining room more intimate.

Bachelorette Pad

SITTING ROOM, BEFORE: The dark palette overwhelms the room and the entry looks like wasted space.

Bachelorette Pad

SITTING ROOM, AFTER: The new sitting area has gotten a fresh coat of paint and the bright, reupholstered furniture makes it modern, feminine, and welcoming.

Bachelorette Pad

DINING AREA, BEFORE: This isn't the open-concept style the buyer is looking for and the funky green paint job makes the space feel even more cramped.

Bachelorette Pad

DINING AREA, AFTER: Light walls in the dining area give the impression of more space. A crystal chandelier hangs above the second-hand dining table and chairs that have been painted bright, solid colors.

Bachelorette Pad

KITCHEN, BEFORE: There's not much counter space for storage or food preparation. Worst of all, the refrigerator is tucked away in a side room.

Bachelorette Pad

KITCHEN, AFTER: Soft green walls brighten the mood of the entire room. Jonathan brought in stainless steel appliances, a sparkly glass tile backsplash, granite countertops, and a modern sink with a vintage feel. An antique table used as an island is the height of shabby chic.

Bachelorette Pad

LIVING ROOM, BEFORE: This room in the back of the house was being used as a master bedroom, but doors with windows raise concerns about privacy.

Bachelorette Pad

LIVING ROOM, AFTER: The new living room has a bright coat of paint, with soft green accents on the support beams. Second-hand furniture has been reupholstered in bright prints. This colorful living room is airy, soothing, and inviting.

Bachelorette Pad

BATHROOM, BEFORE: This small closet is about to be transformed.

Bachelorette Pad

BATHROOM, AFTER: Jonathan took down a wall between the small closet and small laundry room. He used the combined space and transformed it into a dreamy bathroom, complete with a gold-leafed tub and chandelier.

High-End Home

BATHROOM, BEFORE: This old master bathroom was dated by old fixtures, wallpaper and a dark wood vanity. The unusual corner toilet and bidet were not to the buyers' liking either.

High-End Home

BATHROOM, AFTER: The old master bathroom was completely gutted. The floors, vanity, toilet, and fixtures were removed to make room for new Terrazzo tile floors and a custom vanity with his & hers sinks. White subway tile is the backdrop for the new tub and rain shower.

High-End Home

KITCHEN, BEFORE: The space is lackluster with old appliances, fixtures and a bland color sceme.

High-End Home

KITCHEN, AFTER: The kitchen was compeltely transformed. The cabinetry was replaced with dark-toned wood lowers and white uppers. Four frosted glass uppers add a modern feel that helps open up the room with a reflective surface. A black quartz countertop was installed, as well as new high-end stainless steel appliances. The exterior door of the paneled dishwasher blends perfectly with the wood-paneled cabinets and drawers, creating a seamless look.

High-End Home

BEDROOM, BEFORE: The old master bedroom was rather plain, but it had one overbearing feature: The previous owners installed a large-scale stained glass window with an Asian-influenced mountain scene.

High-End Home

BEDROOM, AFTER: A fresh paint job gives the bedroom some color, with an accent wall behind the bed to help break up the space. A new ceiling fan was added and the mountain scene stained glass window replaced with an attractive horizontal privacy window. Mid-century side tables and lamps satisfy the buyers' modern tastes.

An Eclectic Vision

LIVING ROOM, BEFORE: The old living room was humdrum with white walls and cement floors that had not been fully finished.

An Eclectic Vision

LIVING ROOM, AFTER: The original living room cement flooring was stained a warmer color and dark grey paint was added to the walls. The large metal storage unit resembles an old set of lockers, which brings a rustic, industrial feel. Two vintage side chairs were reupholstered in a bright color to help break up the space and an old wood coffee table was updated with a darker stain. The one-of-a-kind star-shaped light bulb installation ties in well with the owner's bright personality. The combination of these unique pieces gives the room a personal identity, making it feel homey and inviting.

An Eclectic Vision

DINING AREA, BEFORE: The original dining area was practically a blank canvas with plain white walls.

An Eclectic Vision

DINING AREA, AFTER: Plum-colored wallpaper and neutral grey paint bring drama to the small eating nook. A square whitewashed wood kitchen table is functional for eating and entertaining. Three wicker chairs compliment the table and add texture to the space. The light fixture (made from a brass birdcage) is a romantic twist.

An Eclectic Vision

BATHROOM, BEFORE: Old pink tiles with brown accents? This space desperately needed an update and a clean sweep. The only part of the bathroom the new owner wanted to hold on to was the old radiator.

An Eclectic Vision

BATHROOM, AFTER: The flooring, fixtures, tub, toilet and vanity were replaced with updated items. The bathtub surround was given a soft, earthy 1x1 glass mosaic tile to add glimmer and femininity to the room. The stainless steel wall tile with gold accent tiles create a luxurious feel. The blue wall paint adds a dramatic pop of color and the new black granite sink sits on top of a wooden vanity with a glass top that adds plenty of storage to the room.

An Eclectic Vision

KITCHEN, BEFORE: The dated appliances, backsplash and asbestos tile floors were three big strikes against the original kitchen. Its only redeeming quality was the solid wood cabinets.

An Eclectic Vision

KITCHEN, AFTER: The original cabinets were freshened up with a deeper, richer stain and small mosaic tiles installed as a colorful, contrasting backsplash. Steel appliances and countertops infuse the space with an urban rustic vibe.

Fit for a Family

LIVING ROOM, BEFORE: This living room was bland and the tile floor made it feel cold and uninviting. The wet bar in the corner was a waste of space.

Fit for a Family

LIVING ROOM, AFTER: The new living room is modern and bright. Replacing the tile with acacia wood flooring added some much-needed warmth. The sofa was custom-designed for the homeowner, and wood and metal pieces were purchased to balance out the more feminine elements.

Fit for a Family

KITCHEN, BEFORE: This kitchen was large, but the dark cabinets and countertops made the room seem small and claustrophobic.

Fit for a Family

KITCHEN, AFTER: The original cabinets were kept in the new kitchen, but they were repainted a soft yellow. The old island was replaced with a larger one with room for three barstools. The original granite countertops were kept to save money, but the island has a new bamboo top. A bright backsplash made from ceramic tiles goes well with the existing granite. The opening between the kitchen and the old dining room were closed to create an extra room.

Extended Family Fun

LIVING ROOM, BEFORE: The homebuyers did not like having a fireplace, and the wood paneling, wood beams, and the wall-to-wall white carpeting were past their prime.

Extended Family Fun

The fireplace has been removed and replaced with an accordion bi-fold door that lets plenty of natural light in and shows off the beautiful backyard. A soft blue-gray paint was added to the walls to give a fresh feel and the existing carpet was replaced by hardwood floors. A sectional couch and two teal accent chairs add function and a jolt of color. The modern two-tier rectangular coffee table and low-standing rustic wood TV console are complimentary to one another.

Extended Family Fun

KITCHEN, BEFORE: The original kitchen had not been updated in years and the layout felt claustrophobic.

Extended Family Fun

KITCHEN, AFTER: The wall between kitchen and living room was taken out, which creates a better layout for traffic and flow. The stainless steel pendants over the island are a modern take on a traditional style. The stained maple cabinets are soft and neutral, but also give the room a modern twist. Brand-new stainless steel appliances and the quartz-top breakfast bar give this kitchen a fresh start.

Active in the City

CLOSET, BEFORE: The large, side-by-side washer and dryer in the kitchen was taking up a majority of the storage closet.

Active in the City

CLOSET, AFTER: Built-in shelves were added inside the pantry around a new stacked washer and dryer and also to the backside of the doors for additional storage, which was an important element for the homebuyers.

Active in the City

KITCHEN, BEFORE: The old kitchen was a drab green color, and the appliances and floors were in need of an update.

Active in the City

KITCHEN, AFTER: The new kitchen is light and modern, with all-new stainless steel appliances, countertops, cabinets and tile flooring. A new white subway tile backsplash keeps the kitchen work area bright.

Active in the City

BEDROOM, BEFORE: The bedroom was a good size, but a blank canvas.

Active in the City

BEDROOM, AFTER: A darker, earthy green was selected for the walls to coordinate with the green accents in the adjacent bathroom. The original laminate flooring was kept to keep costs lower. A new rattan pendant replaced the old ceiling fan for a decorative touch. Two new nightstands and a bench that was reupholstered in a kiwi green suede were added alongside the homeowner's existing wood bed and 6-drawer dresser. A few shimmery art pieces add a little sparkle around the room offset the earthy, natural feeling in the other pieces.

Empty Dining Room

Not Suburban or Subdivision

DINING ROOM, BEFORE: This former rental property's rich wood elements gave it a lot of character, but making it seem less dark and dated would take some serious work.

Dining Room

Not Suburban or Subdivision

DINING ROOM, AFTER: The dining room is lighter and brighter with white trim. Custom shelves keep clutter at bay.

Before Kitchen

Not Suburban or Subdivision

KITCHEN, BEFORE: Talk about claustrophobic! The original kitchen was very narrow, due to a wall separating it from the dining room.

Remodeled Kitchen

Not Suburban or Subdivision

KITCHEN, AFTER: Jonathan knocked down the wall so the kitchen's sight lines would extend all the way into the living room. The two-tier island and high-end appliances make it feel modern and luxurious.

Before Living Room

Not Suburban or Subdivision

LIVING ROOM, BEFORE: The living room, while spacious, was a little uninviting and old-fashioned.

Living Room

Not Suburban or Subdivision

LIVING ROOM, AFTER: The fireplace, updated to a gas system, is more eco-friendly. The original woodwork was repaired and refinished to give it the charm and warmth the buyers craved.

Before Bedroom

Empty Nesters Explore the City

BEDROOM, BEFORE: The corner-lot bungalow Drew found had a big bedroom. Unfortunately, it was purple and the floors were well-worn.

Remodeled Bedroom

Empty Nesters Explore the City

BEDROOM, AFTER: Ditching the purple paint job and adding red accents transformed this bedroom into a romantic retreat that's right on budget.

Before Kitchen

Empty Nesters Explore the City

KITCHEN, BEFORE: The small galley kitchen, closed off by walls, was barely functional and cramped.

Kitchen

Empty Nesters Explore the City

KITCHEN, AFTER: With some assistance from the homeowners, Jonathan knocked down the wall to transform the space. Now it's light, airy and perfect for entertaining.

Before Dining and Living Room

Empty Nesters Explore the City

LIVING ROOM/DINING ROOM, BEFORE: These areas, while spacious, had structural issues and the flooring was less than ideal.

White and Brown Dining and Living Room

Empty Nesters Explore the City

LIVING ROOM/DINING ROOM, AFTER: Switching up the living room and dining room spaces made all the difference here. High-end pieces, like the custom chandelier above the dining room table, add touches of elegance.

Old Living Room

Suburbs to City Life

LIVING ROOM, BEFORE: The front room is dated, cramped and boxy. The fireplace might be a selling point...if there wasn't a radiator inside it. It's a fixer-upper, for sure.

Living Room

Suburbs to City Life

LIVING ROOM, AFTER: After five weeks of demolition and design, the home looks like new. Taking out the walls on the main floor allows light to fill the space and the modern furnishings keep things current.

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