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Candice's Design Tips: Celebrity Homes

The Design Stars create spaces for celebrities: a home office for Kathy Griffin, a guest bedroom for Tiffani Thiessen and a nursery for Jason Priestley. See what Candice says they did right, did wrong and how she could have done it better.

Add Excitement to a Room
This room already had good bones: great size and balanced proportions with wonderful features like gorgeous dark hardwood floors, timber beamed ceilings and a window flanked with built-in cabinetry that features a luxurious daybed. The big challenge here was to take this good room and make it great.

Once again Lonni pulls a familiar element from her bag of design tricks. The graphic feature wall approach is getting a bit repetitive which under any other circumstances would be cause to worry. But, I think the printing on grass cloth idea is so brilliant that all is forgiven. She's earned a little spot in Design Heaven for that move!

However, the strength of the customized wallpaper is quickly overshadowed by a rustic wood headboard that is simply "plunked" on the bed and not attached securely to the wall. In a room that didn't require a lot of work there is no excuse for not finishing the project.

The textured grass cloth wallpaper is a big reason that this room feels so warm and inviting. However, when used in conjunction with too many elements of similar texture and color, such as the sisal carpet and woven grass chairs, the impact of the paper is lost. To make the most of these types of dry, matte, toothy surfaces they need to be contrasted against elements that are reflective and that sparkle and shine.

Take the existing cabinets, for example. The grass cloth is just more of the same. Backing the existing cabinets with mirror and replacing the wood shelves with glass would have set off the texture of the other surfaces as well as adding depth and excitement to the room.

Create a Room of Discovery
Dan's design is not only beautiful but incredibly thoughtful. He has created a room that serves all of the functional needs of a baby and it does so with a design solution that is both nurturing and stimulating. I can also see how this room can transition and evolve with the baby from toddler to the teen years.

I love that this room has a good dose of eclecticism — furniture and finishes speak to each other rather than match exactly and that's what gives the space character and personality.

This is a space that invites exploration and discovery from the blackboard cabinet doors to the ingenious custom mobile. It's also a space filled with textures and color that still manages to be calm and restful.

This room has it all...almost! Black-out lining on the drapes are a necessity in any baby's room, helping baby and parents get much-valued sleep. Also, in a room that already has so much going on I would have kept the wall colors the same to unify the room better and let the dreamy custom wall treatment at the entry be the big wall story.

Accessories Finish the Space
A large part of the process of office design is taken up with meeting the practical and functional needs of the client. The challenge is how to bring beauty and excitement to the world of file cabinets and push-pins. It's a tall order but Antonio's done it!

The wall color is vibrant and unexpected. The cool tones of the walls marry beautifully with the steely blue work stations — both enhanced by the contrast of the wood floor's warm richness.

On the down side, accessories, whether for a living room or an office, are like pieces of jewelry that finish an outfit; the lack of office accessories makes this room feel naked and unfinished.

Scale is a bit of an issue here as well. I love the idea of the mirrored wall map but it's not enough of a good thing. A super-sized map that filled that back wall area would make more of a statement with the added bonus of reflecting more natural light from the outside into this dark inner area.

An area carpet for two lounge chairs like this needs to be at least 4'x 6'. This one looks like a case of “honey, I shrunk the carpet!”

I would have taken advantage of the view out through the large window and doors and positioned the desks perpendicular to the wall rather than facing them. Given a choice of views: a) bulletin board or b) sunny LA. I'd take LA any day!

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